Hike the Ka‘u Coast: Punalu‘u to Kamehame – Saturday, June 4 | Hawai`i News Daily

Hike the Ka‘u Coast: Punalu‘u to Kamehame – Saturday, June 4

Honu ‘ea Sea Turtle Hatchling

Honu ‘ea hatchlings make their way to the sea with the help of the Hawksbill Turtle Recovery Project volunteers. On Saturday, June 4, a five-mile round-trip interpretive hike leaves from Punalu‘u to explore the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail in honor of National Trails Day®. The hike’s turn-around point is Kamehame Beach, a primary nesting site for the endangered hawksbill turtle. To register for “Hike the Ka‘u Coast: Punalu‘u to Kamehame,” contact Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at 985-7373 or www.fhvnp.org.

Volcano, HI – In honor of the American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day®, join Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Ranger Jay Robinson for an all-day program: “Hike the Ka‘u Coast: Punalu‘u to Kamehame.”  Held on Saturday, June 4, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., this five-mile round-trip interpretive hike explores the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail.

The day begins with native Hawaiian Shanell Dedman introducing participants to the ancient cultural stories and sites at Punalu‘u.  From the legendary supernatural birthing stones and the mystical turtle guardian Kauila to the Punalu‘u Nui luakini heiau (sacrificial temple), Shanell shares her family’s mana‘o (wisdom) of this special place.

The program continues with a hike along a small section of the Ala Kahakai (“trail by the sea”), a 175-mile foot path full of cultural and historical significance.

On Saturday, June 4, a five-mile round-trip interpretive hike leaves from Punalu‘u to explore the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail in honor of National Trails Day®. The day begins with native Hawaiian Shanell Dedman introducing the ancient cultural stories and sites at Punalu‘u. The program continues with a hike along a small section of the Ala Kahakai (“trail by the sea”), a 175-mile foot path rich with cultural and historical significance. To register for “Hike the Ka‘u Coast: Punalu‘u to Kamehame,” contact Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at 985-7373 or www.fhvnp.org. Credit: NPS/Jay Robinson

According to its Web site, Ala Kahakai “traverses through hundreds of ancient Hawaiian settlement sites and through over 200 ahupua‘a, or traditional sea to mountain land divisions. Cultural resources along the trail include several important heiau (temples), royal centers, kahua (house site foundations), loko ‘ia (fishponds), ko‘a (fishing shrines), ki‘i pohaku (petroglyphs), holua (stone slide), and wahi pana (sacred places).”

“Heading out from Punalu‘u, we’ll pass anchialine pools, sea cliffs, crashing waves, and native sea turtle habitat,” states Robinson, who adds, “This moderately strenuous hike will traverse raw pahoehoe and ‘a‘a fields along a windswept, sun-soaked landscape.  Hikers should be in good condition, able to do without shade all day in a remote, rugged area.  Bring a bathing suit to cool off in pools along the way, as well as at Punalu‘u at the end of the hike.”

The hike’s turn-around point is Kamehame, the black sand beach that is a primary nesting site for honu ‘ea (hawksbill turtles).  Here participants will have a lunch break and learn about the Hawksbill Turtle Recovery Project and efforts to protect this endangered marine animal.

During the 2010 nesting season, “Four turtles and 10 nests were documented at this hawksbill nesting mecca….  Kamehame had the most nesters and nests in the State,” noted project leaders on the Reptiles Alive! Blog.  “From the 10 nests, we estimate that over 1,345 hatchlings reached the sea.”

This event is presented by the Hawai‘i Volcanoes Institute, which is part of the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a non-profit organization.  Program cost is $50 for Friends members and $65 for non-members.  Students (K-12 and college with valid student ID) are half-price.  Non-members are welcome to join the Friends in order to get the member discount.

To register, call 985-7373 or visit www.fhvnp.org.  To support the Hawksbill Recovery Project, please visithttp://www.fhvnp.org/Donate.html, scroll down to the bottom of the page, and chose your donation amount.

 

Green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) can often be found basking at Punalu‘u Beach. On Saturday, June 4, a five-mile round-trip interpretive hike leaves from Punalu‘u to explore the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail in honor of National Trails Day®. The day begins with native Hawaiian Shanell Dedman introducing Punalu‘u’s ancient cultural sites and stories, including that of the mystical turtle guardian Kauila. To register for “Hike the Ka‘u Coast: Punalu‘u to Kamehame,” contact Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at 985-7373 or www.fhvnp.org. Credit: NPS/Jay Robinson


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  • Huntter Larson

    ‘ea can be used alone to mean hawksbill turtle, but ‘ea can also mean melody, tune, etc…

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  • Huntter Larson

    No, Honu’ea is the term used in Hawaiian for Hawskbill turtle, honu means any turtle but also green sea turtle seeing as how it is the most prevalent found in hawaiian waters

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  • reefannie

    I believe that ‘EA was the name used for Hawksbills. HONU is for the green. I’m pretty sure the names were not used together.

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