Personification

Personification is where the inanimate is given human attribute/anthropomorphic. Lyric in poetry expresses feeling/though. Free verse creative/descriptive, not just rhyme cant. Idyll a short rural scene. Rhyme feminine final unstressed syllable ["longing/yearning"]. Masculine final stressed syllable ["peak/creek"]. Epigram short wit ["melody clings/climbs"]. Elegy — Gray’s “Country Churchyard. Headstone graced w/verse is ubiquitous imprint/style. Back to Gray, “The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, the plowman plods his weary way, dirges due in sad array, through the churchway path we saw him borne, a youth to fortune and to fame unknown, Melancholy marked him for her own, his soul sincere, he gave to misery all he had, a tear, he gained from Heaven a friend. Maui contempo troubadors Sly Dog great arrangement/style w/song “A World of Love. Hawaiian language enunciation/phonetics vowel-laden a language of creation [too without the t][Aaaaah][ooooooh]. Not vulgar/lecherous/obscene, but sensual/romantic. Rapture, not profane. Visceral/primal, not salaciously erotic. Glide slide/tremelo-vibrato.

Maui’s Red Dog’s “World full of love ["Lovers holding hands, walk in the sand (beach), under the bright, starry moonlight, in a world full of love"] enchanting melody, subdued modulation, so pleasurable!! Tonality/vibrato-tremelo surreal/enthralling. Julia A. Fletcher Carney (1823-1908)–

Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean
And the pleasant land.

Thus the little minutes,
Humble though they be,
Make the mighty ages
Of eternity.

Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Make our earth an Eden,
Like the heaven above.

From linguistic expert Dr. Richard E. Wood: “Hawaiian is a member of the Polynesian branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language family, now also called Austronesian. Its members range from Madagascar to Rapa Nui (Easter Island). It is not related to Sanskrit or English. Some pioneering scientific work may have been undertaken on the esthetics of language. It suggests that the majority of human beings find linguistic [esthetic] beauty in languages which have a high ratio of vowels, particularly open vowels and long vowels, to consonants. Such languages include Italian and Hawaiian. For example, meaningful utterances containing only vowels can be constructed in Hawaiian, e.g. eia Iao ‘behold Iao (the Iao needle on Maui).’ Languages with a high proportion of consonants to vowels, or with only consonants and no vowels, have less esthetic appeal for most humans. Examples are Serbian, Croat, Czech, and Sanskrit. A meaningful sentence in Czech containing no vowels is strc prst crz krk, (which means) ’stick a finger through (your) neck.’

Anelaikalani Jennings’ vocal is exquisitely haunting/edgy/strong, to me much better than Raiatea Helm’s. Onomatopoeia [words imitate sounds/exhalations -- whoosh of aaaaahhh/ooooohh--sounds of procreation] extraordinary re Hawaiian vowels. Kaona/subtext/sensuality in sound/enunciation affect magically. For now and for always, till time disappears [Ronnie Milsap].

Free association/stroke of genius/stream of consciousness key Hawaiian ‘olelo/compositions, as classical narratives key Luso works. But the mele/tunes differ except for crescendo/intensity emblematic of Monarchal cadence/stilted piano preface/soaring-majestic anthem, & swooping choral replete thruout. Johnny Almeida/Sonny Cunha/Sonny Chillingworth Luso, & Latin-named are Lena Machado/Vicki Rodrigues. “Strong/silent type Gary Cooper Luso typify Luso alms/beneficence, not bombast/roister. Humility/quiet strength personify Luso custom/tradition a la great sportsman Al Vierra. My closer to Luso culture: Forever, I visualize & draw near to your authentic beauty & truth. With faith & belief, invoke love immortal! Viver bem/live fully.

Imagine, 500 covers/reduxes of “Fly Me To The Moon, easy chord progression, one piano key to the next, simple diction ["Fly me to the moon, and let me play among the stars, let me see what Spring is like on Jupiter and Mars, in other words, hold my hand, in other words, darling kiss me ..."], sigh Easy does it, baby!

John Lennon’s “Across the Universe his favorite composition– serenity/tranquility/inner peace-comfort. Metaphysical, really¦. sigh¦

Notice how classical operatic melodies spring wondrously even today?? A la Albert Nahale’a “He Punahele No ‘oe. Divine/ho’ano!!

Oh yes, 1927’s “Are You Lonesome Tonight a heartthrob melody. To me, Elvis’ best cover/redux of
the Flapper tune. Neil Sedaka born 1939, piano virtuoso, what a presence!!! Unique understates him. Yes, of Jewish heritage, this guy can sing/belt’em w/the best!!

My heroine Hawea Waia’u embraces the heartlines of nostalgia and folklore in our tribute to our ancestors, ‘aumakua o ka po, spirits of the distant past, who remain alive so long as their memories are recalled and revered, and the wisdom they’ve shared is passed on from one generation to the next, resurgent and enduring, embodied in each recurring successor, the ancient sages who wait to be recognized within us all, in Jesus’ name, Amena.

Classy Greer Garson once said, “The mirror (of life) should be tilted slightly upward toward the cheerful, the tender, the compassionate, the brave, the funny, the encouraging. In 1997’s Oscar winner “Titanic movie, Kate Winslet’s character Rose implores portrait sketch artist/vagabond Leonard DiCaprio’s character, “Jack, you see things. Jack replies, “I liked her sense of humor, even though she lost a leg, and even if she is a lady of the night in her native Paris. To which smitten Rose challenges this sketch artist, “Immortalize me, Jack! Love is forever. Romance is not dead. Hard to imagine a marriage, or life, without romance. Rose and Jack have the right sentimental feel.

Let me share with you about cuz Leilani Kauinui of Ha’ena — as Capt. Craig Kamahele pronounced w/Craig’s ‘Opihi Man treasured song, yearning memories of Ha’ena wash over me w/fun! A’ama crabs, pipipi, pulehu, Uncle Kona crunching on the manini from his throw net¦ aaah, ho’ano/divine!! Uncle Kona’s uwehe/hula knee knock sensuality-humor, Leilani’s expression of songs via the hula, picture of grace, purity personified, fantasia/euphoria. As I reminisce about the past, my ‘olelo goes, “Mauna Kea, like a spired loft convent, devoutly clambers up to the blue of God’s sky, its base garland green, its beauty carved and cradled by the hands of a saint, its weathered abode soft at its peak, rocks contoured by creeks¦ its forest rim billowed dim and faint, close-clinging streams which tickle below, to reveal the plain of Waiakea¦ Mauna Kea’s majesty so steeped, her breadth so alluring, angels smile in its forest folds, where springs bathe flora, & birds sing in the tree tops¦ small hills abound, reach joyfully toward the sky, ravines nestle snugly beneath the grassy slopes, luscious rose apples appear in the thicket of trees, cool gales whisper past green sleeves of bough¦ gusts of cricket mirth ascend up the slopes¦ river rocks clatter of ambles, colors alive, thru the valleys they roll¦ to seashells of Waiakea, echoes of tides, of caressing mists, of currents & fathoms below¦ these, then, are glimpses of God’s pleasures in Mauna Kea, down the slopes to the sea at Waiakea. And as I kneel below the bough of the tree, as the Angel’s music clings & climbs, such wondrous music of heaven’s chimes. My history guru June Gutmanis 1925-1998 had her holy trinity to comfort her, consisting of 1) Ellen Howarth’s “Where is the heart that doth not keep, within its inmost core, some fond remembrance hidden deep, of days that are no more? A tress of my loved one’s hair? 2) Gustav Mahler’s “If you love romance for romance sake, not me, doth love me for your sake, just as I love you!! 3) 15th century Judaic poem, â€Ŧloving you is really living [kererte a ti es bivir en verdad]. I’d add Hastings & Psalm 118:24, “Relish the moment, rejoice!! Find your events, go to your heart, do the unthinkable — love!! Rarest June rekindled an ancient Nippon proverb, “Rosoku wa mi wo herashite hito wo terasu, ergo, candles give life/illumination to others, though giving up their very existence. Till time disappears, –Curt

HS Booth: Like butterflies & flowers, I come to lay down among the things I love. Resurgent soirees of the soul/innate pleasure center — RM Rilke: Reflect, dear friend, on the world within. It might be recollections of childhood — such innermost place is worth all your love and observation. Don’t try to clarify your feelings to others, don’t be weighed beneath social conventions and overhead forces. The deep Cosmos are here, and stand amid life, vibrant, enriching. Siddartha Gautama [Buddha] renounced his Hindu elitism in which only the chosen few attain transcendence, & he founded an inclusive philosophy, today’s Buddhism, premised on the triology of dharma [infinite wisdom]/sangha [devout confidants]/buddha [mentor]. June Gutmanis’ dharma [spiritually resplendent] is her core being ['uhane/soul, boundless compassion-love for all]. June’s buddha is her auspicious mentor, Ted Kelsey [who helped inspire today's UH Hilo Hawaiian language program]. Don’t ever tell me you’re your own worst critic — what you’re actually demonstrating is how vain/narcissistic/self-inflated you are. Or that you don’t have time for anything — you need to be made to have an appointment for one to see you. Ridiculous. Hilo’s little orphan boy Frank Calvomatta died in the tearful embrace of Catholic Father Louis, & with Frank’s last breath, the mercy of God Almighty was upon him, 1916, Frank’s gravesite by Father Louis at Catholic cemetery behind Hilo Terrace Apts. across DOE annex below Hilo High track.

June Gutmanis had great synergy with everyone — symbiosis, really!! Vegas caliche/Korea basalt/Pu’u Wa’a Wa’a tholeiite, June loved rocks, penned book titled “Pohaku [rock], among her other famous works ["Na Pule Kahiko"]["Kahuna La'au Lapa'au"]. June told me I was her best friend [yeah, right -- she probably told the whole world each one is her best friend!! ]

The Story Tellers: We are the chosen ones.

My feelings are that in each family there is one who seems called to find the ancestors. To put flesh on their bones and make them live again, to tell the family story and to feel that somehow they know and approve.

To me, doing genealogy is not a cold gathering of facts but, instead, breathing life into all who have gone before. We are the story tellers of the tribe. All tribes have one. We have been called as it were, by our genes.

Those who have gone before cry out to us: Tell our story! So, we do. In finding them, we somehow find ourselves. How many graves have I stood before and cried? I have lost count. How many times have I told the ancestors, “You have a wonderful family, you would be proud of us! How many times have I walked up to a grave and felt somehow there was love there for me? I cannot say.

It goes beyond just documenting facts. It goes to who am I and why do I do the things I do. It goes to seeing a cemetery about to be lost forever to weeds and indifference, and saying I can’t let this happen. The bones here are bones of my bone and flesh of my flesh. It goes to doing something about it.

It goes to pride in what our ancestors were able to accomplish. How they contributed to what we are today. It goes to respecting their hardships and losses, their never giving in or giving up, their resoluteness to go on and build a life for their family.

It goes to deep pride that they fought to make and keep us a Nation. It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are them and they are us. (For we without them cannot be made perfect.)

So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take their place in the long line of family storytellers.

That, is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and put flesh on the bones.

By: Della M. Cummings Wright – Re-written by her Granddaughter, Della JoAnn McGinnis Johnson – Edited and Reworded By: Tom Dunn

Denise Takashima, our Ragna Rath/Sister Marian Cope incarnate, loves the uncompromising mix of string hums & guitar fret squeaks, old-time purity amid today’s sweetening of edits/dubs. Triste/affanato [wail] of Santana, older echo being George Harrison’s “While my guitar gently weeps. Slack key guitar isn’t Hawaiian original, but steel guitar is! Frank Sinatra at The Sands Hotel, “Fly Me To The Moon — Fly me to the moon, let me sing among those stars, let me see what spring is like on jupiter and mars. In other words, hold my hand, in other words, baby kissme. Fill my heart with song, let me sign forever more, you are all I long for, all I worship and adore. In other words, please be true. In other words, I love you! Wow :-)

Pseudonym Valerie born 1943 is Emily Dickinson’s hummingbird
w/its unique flight pattern, which Emily calls our route of experience, inexplicable yet profound, with all kinds of paradoxes [love/fear -- joy/sadness]. Daring/bold, boundless zest, love over fear.

Social stratification: Clark Gable/Claudette Colbert’s 1934 “It Happened One Night about breaking class/status barrier [rich girl trapped/suffocated by her class status falls in love w/crude but liberating commoner] symbolic genesis of Leo DiCaprio’s/Kate Winslet’s “Titanic, Leo/Kate giving their performances of a lifetime in this unforgettable 1997 film about the power, the unadorned majesty of love. “The Misfits with Clark Gable/Marilyn Monroe [Gable died shortly after & Gable's widow blamed Monroe] — soft-heart Monroe’s Roslyn asks macho diehard Gable’s Langland, “How do you find your way back in the dark? Langland summons, “Just head for that big star straight on. The highway’s under it — it’ll take us right home. Home is in the heart, and highway is in the head.

Gary Cooper’s “High Noon 1952 best-ever Western. Cooper had just broken up w/flame Patricia Neal. Gaunt/depressed/withdrawn, Cooper became his scripted character, role of a lifetime, age 51. Johnny Depp/Tom Cruise terrific range/edges. Marilyn Monroe vulnerable, her greatest strength, unlike current throb Diane Lane, suffused w/assurance.

Winston Churchill once said there was nothing which concentrated the mind like being shot at and missed. Chaplain Hiro Higuchi 1907-1981, my Dad’s 442 buddy, confided to his wife Hisako the shock of witnessing the carnage of war up-close: â€Ŧ my nerves are completely shaken. Nothing I can say or write will even describe the horror of war and the intense fear that grips one all the time one is on the front lines. O Lord, when will this horror end? Whenever I pass one of our men so still on the road with his body covered — I think of his family in the islands — all because a couple of madmen [Hitler/Tojo] in the world wanted everything for themselves. A few more weeks of this, and I shall go mad. Oh so true¦.

Giri ninjo, to serve humanity, Nippon adage unknown to turks Scrub Tanaka 1915-2006/Scrub’s prodigy Isamu Kanekuni born 1921 88 yrs. young. For my mac nuts, I favor original Japanese immigrants here/Issei, who were unable to be U.S. citizens until after 1952, at which point most of them had died, a decade after the formation of the greatest fighting unit in U.S. military history, our 100th/442 all-Nisei [2nd generation Japanese in America] soldiers. Issei pulled our fate out of the maelstrom of settling here [poverty/hardship], & gaijin/haole Jack Burns 1909-1975 became our messiah — kokoro-heart, ganbari-perseverance, chigi-loyalty, gaman-resolute & quiet strength, hokori-pride, meiyo-honor, though Burns 1st was perceived as warui-bad-reviled spy chief [to lock up suspected J_p saboteurs]. Kevin Costner’s “Dances w/Wolves & Val Kilmer’s “Thunderheart blockbuster movies symbolically illustrate Burns’ life, & how haole [not Big 5, but grassroot common lot] Burns made it his mission to the death to ensure racial equality/fair play for the Asian immigrants/progeny, the very folks he was assigned to jail in/lock up WWII. Burns in turn grew into our legendary action folk hero, our holy father/consecrated ground. Giri ninjo honto ni, Burns became our modern day Buddha/Jesus. Our Issei immigrants gave us the ability to assimilate/adapt, & Burns carried it thru to the end [of his life]. Yes, Ted Tsukiyama’s/Tom Brokaw’s “Greatest WWII Generation is popularized, but for my mac nuts, my big heroes are our Issei forebearers. And to bi-racial high school senior Michael Robinson, Mormon prodigy/astounding prophet in the making, mele mai/pololei, — till time disappears.

___________________________________

Erudite scribe George Will ranks the 3 worst cases in U.S. Supreme Court history — 1) Dred Scott 1857 which concocted a constitutional right, unmentioned in the Document, to own slaves and which started the Civil War — yes, half a million lives lost over the idiocy of so-called intelligent men with black robes; 2) Plessy vs. Ferguson 1896 which ratified racial segregation (euphemism of separate but equal); 3) Korematsu vs. U.S. 1944 which ratified blanket internment of U.S. citizens of Japanese ancestry [AJAs or JAs] during wartime. Boumediene vs. Bush 2008 is George’s fine exemplar of the inherent value of checks/balances among the 3 branches of government [legislative/executive/judicial] — that the prisoners at Guantánamo “have the constitutional right to habeas corpus, enabling them to challenge the basis of their detention, under the terms of the 800-year old “Great Writ of habeas corpus, which prohibits the suspension of prisoners’ rights to challenge the basis of their detention except in “cases of rebellion or invasion. Habeas means that the executive branch cannot be the only judge of its own judgment, that it has to release a prisoner or show through due process why the prisoner should be held. Of Guantanamo’s approximately 270 detainees, many are dangerous “enemy combatants, some may not be, but per Boumediene none will be released by this court decision, which does not even guarantee a right to a hearing. Rather, it guarantees only a right to request a hearing, inasmuch courts retain considerable discretion regarding such requests. Habeas is the great writ of liberty, inasmuch no state power is more fearsome than the power to imprison. Thence, habeas lies at the heart of the age-old struggle to constrain governments, in which our greatest result was our Constitution, which limits Congress’ power to revoke habeas to periods of rebellion or invasion. Thence, Congress exceeded its authority when Congress [via Military Commissions Act 2006] withdrew federal court jurisdiction over detainees’ habeas claims. Marbury vs. Madison 1803 by Chief Justice John Marshall, the greatest jurist in U.S. history, launched and validated judicial supervision of America’s democratic government — Marshall asked, “To what purpose are powers limited, and to what purpose is that limitation committed to writing, if these limits may, at any time, be passed by those intended to be restrained? Our greatest AJA scholar, Franklin Odo born 1939 Kaimuki High grad ‘57, currently director of Pacific region section at D.C.’s Smithsoninan Museum, champions overturning of Korematsu case — per Wikipedia, “indeed, Korematsu’s conviction for evading internment was overturned on November 10, 1983, after Korematsu challenged the earlier decision by filing for a writ of coram nobis. In a ruling by Judge Marilyn Hall Patel, the United States District Court for the Northern District of California granted the writ (that is, it voided Korematsu’s original conviction) because in Korematsu’s original case, the government had knowingly submitted false information to the Supreme Court that had a material impact on the Supreme Court’s decision. The Korematsu decision has not been explicitly overturned. Indeed, the Korematsu ruling is significant both for being the first instance of the Supreme Court applying the strict scrutiny standard to racial discrimination by the government and for being one of only a tiny handful of cases in which the Court held that the government met that standard.

Asian immigrants were banned from U.S. citizenship [e.g., Chinese Exclusion Act 1882]. Since only citizens can vote, our Asian immigrants could not vote. Yet incredulously, they were conscripted/drafted to fight for a country which denied them the fundamental liberties of citizenship/suffrage. To illustrate the vacuous contrivance of legal edicts, Issei Takao Ozawa, armed w/Cal Berkeley schooling, sought citizenship in 1902/1914, inasmuch the 1790 Naturalization Act did not exclude “Mongolian stock. But the U.S. Supreme Court reprised racial profiling by interpreting the 1790 Act & 3 later revisions as banning Mongolians by implication. Analog: In 1918 Congress passed special legislation granting citizenship to alien WWI veterans. Hidematsu Toyota was granted citizenship from courageous local federal judge Vaughn, despite protestations from INS Examiner Ragsdale. Judge Vaughn granted citizenship to 400 Issei & 300 other Asians. But the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Vaughn’s ruling & configuratively cancelled Toyama’s citizenship on grounds that the 1918 Act excluded Japanese aliens. Chagrined/chastened by such injustice, patriotic Issei prevailed upon Congress to undo the U.S. Supreme Court folly via the later 1935 Act granting citizenship so long overdue/pronounced/resonant. To me, Vaughn was Paul Bunyan, a folk hero/fabled mythic legend to us all.

Rite of passage [learning experience], not martyrdom, for Augie T’s getting a pie in his face — Augie needs to forgive/express empathy for agitator/thug, not become a thug in turn. Love over fear [of failure/rejection/humiliation/loss], baby. I tried expressing this metaphor to Augie’s rep, who exhorted public outrage vs. the assailant, to no avail. Knucklehead mentality — local macho-ness, rep capsules my view as delirium. Stoic resolve the moral masterpiece. Mistreatment a learning experience. Projection/displaced insecurity-inferiority-fear-aggression-accusations are preposterous reactions, yet universally common. Ignorance is the real ascription/byword. Only love endures, always ai/kokoro/aloha.

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  • Thomas

    Wow Curtis………You are a historical treasure the likes of which I have not seen before.

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  • Curtis Narimatsu

    From considerate and composed model of equanimity Sue Kae:

    On Lori Hasegawa of Wahiawa

    Hi Sue: Lori’s an original. I introduce to you vintage Lori:

    I thank erudite Lori Hasegawa for the Ralph Lazo
    story.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stand_Up_for_Justice:_The_Ralph_Lazo_Story

    On magnanimous Lori Hasegawa ““
    Curt to Lori Hasegawa
    subject: Lori’s authenticity
    Hi Lori:
    What makes you knowledgeable about Japanese Americans outside of Hawai’i?
    Were you raised in Hawai’i, and if not, then where?
    If I were to inscribe your hypothetical headstone, what would it say in one sentence? [example, "She was a good daughter, wife, mother, & grandma"]
    I sense your authenticity/realness.
    You’re quite different from local folks. You see beyond our shores. Thanks for the Lazo story. ““Curt

    Hi Curt,
    I am not knowledgeable”¦ I just have an interest because I was so moved by the exhibit at the Japanese American National Museum in LA about 10 years ago. Until then, I had no clue about the WWII Japanese American internment camps and how unfair it was. I couldn’t understand why the Japanese community in LA would have their own basketball leagues and why they always stuck together”¦ then I also found out about the detention camps in Hawai’i “¦.and when I hear the stories about how everyone endured and suffered and yet were so brave”¦ I love the Japanese spirit”¦ I am proud of Japanese history and roots (I studied in Japan for a couple of years) I always think they just don’t make’em like they used to. They were all heroes”¦ one year my mom and I had a table at the JACL convention, and we met the nicest people and I discovered that there was injustice in Peru as well”¦. AH, but I guess there is injustice all over the world”¦. I always want to get involved, but I have discovered that I don’t always follow thru on what I would like to do.
    Oh sorry to digress”¦ born and raised in Wahiawa”¦ live in Mililani”¦ enjoy working with everyone from the big island”¦
    Right now, my headstone would be something like”¦.. “ËœShe was always searching for a way to heal pain and suffering’”¦. Never thought of a headstone”¦ could have been a better everything”¦ not a grandma yet”¦ but I will be a good grandma”¦ whenever that happens”¦ Used to laugh at all the beauty contestant answers about World Peace”¦ but now.. I think “¦ that is what I would like”¦ :-) Aloha,
    Lori
    [Curt's endnote: Lori exemplifies tremendous
    courage & compassion -- Lori is
    quite the original/unique/special
    one you look for in a leader whose
    energy/presence are of "felt
    necessity" in our time, per Oliver
    Wendell Holmes]

    From earthy/compassionate Lori Hasegawa ““
    RE: tiniest grain of sand from a mighty sea”
    Our Vietnam Vets really got the shaft. I didn’t know until I saw the movie “Born on the 4th of July.” I went to Sophia International U in Japan, and there was a Vietnam Vet who had an odd sense of humor, and I remember he tried to make jokes and join in, but no one really seemed to connect with him. I was pretty much a loner as well, and wish that I had been a friend with him.
    Thank you for the info on the two wonderful men. I would never have heard it “¦ had I not read it here [Big Island Chronicle]. Thank you very much!

    Curt wrote: I dedicate freedom’s cause to our Vietnam War combat veterans. Their prodigal abandon speaks to a core component of human nature not seen in these times “ our soldiers never fell short of courage and compassion, and we recognize our greatest generation of unsung and untold Vietnam War soldiers.
    Of Henry Shimabukuro and Henry’s oyabun/sempai [great leader] John D. Lavelle

    From S. Kae to Curt
    Subject: RE: Qigong & life

    Hi Curt,

    Who is Lori ““ she sounds like a neat person. I took Qigong centuries ago in Honolulu ““ only at that time it was called Chi Kung. I hear someone is teaching it at Lili”Ëœuokalani Park.

    Aloha, susan [Curt's note: Translate for Lori, neat is not tidy, it is "cool"]

    From prescient Lori Hasegawa ““
    Curt,
    Just bought a Dalai Lama book and someone gave me a copy of Honda Sensei’s workbook. Hope to develop some ki/qi. Just received some spring forest Qigong CDs which I am lending to a friend who is ill. Just had a discussion recently that all true religions have the same teaching”¦. Love One Another”¦. And if we all love, we will all have peace.
    Which reminds me that I have to send out an email regarding Peace Day Parade and Festival “¦..
    Peace Out!
    Lori :-)

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  • Curtis Narimatsu

    Despite such report, Gen. Lavelle was disgraced and demoted in rank from 4-star to 2-star General, unprecedented. Thence, though 35 yrs. too late in 2007, Mel Laird’s confession fully vindicates Gen. Lavelle. Gen. Lavelle, like Gen. Mark Clark & Clark’s 442nd RCT, & like High Command’s Gen. Omar Bradley, our Soldier’s General, ONLY WANTED TO PROTECT HIS MEN/SQUADRON FIGHTERS!! Destroying Sam missiles was necessary to prevent our aircraft from being destroyed/our men from being killed like sitting ducks. Gen. Lavelle’s dearest friend & subordinate retired Col. Henry Shimabukuro was destined to vindicate/exonerate/absolve Gen. Lavelle & restore honor to Gen. Lavelle & Gen. Lavelle’s family. Air Force Mag published astounding extraordinary revelations in the past 4 yrs. about Gen. Lavelle’s utter crucifixion in the name of politics/CYA[cover your ass][every man for himself], from Nixon [who actually wanted to clear Gen. Lavelle but was persuaded by Laird/Kissinger that to do so could jeopardize our Paris Peace Talks--Laird didn't want to have fingers pointed at Laird] on down to Saigon command “ everyone covered up & expediently fingered Gen. Lavelle, the most caring/compassionate General. “Stir the waters” Biblical but necessary to vindicate our framed-up/crucified/utterly persecuted Gen. Lavelle. Essentially, God’s covenant w/Abraham entailed God’s promise “ “I will bless those who bless you, I will curse those who curse you.” God’s chosen ones include Gen. Lavelle, who died in 1979 at age 62 from a fatal heart attack, no doubt triggered by his disgraced termination from the Air Force. Our country’s top leaders [Nixon/Kissinger/Laird] passed the buck & blamed magnanimous patriot Gen. Lavelle. Kudos to crusader Henry Shimabukuro & his D.C. band of brothers for restoring honor to our hero Gen. Lavelle. Henry Shimabukuro/John D. Lavelle are Jesus’ silent disciples. Love eternally, ““Curt

    ENDNOTE: IMAGINE, NO ONE OUTSIDE OF PI’IHONUA CAMP 4 EVER HEARD OF SHOKAN “JESSE” SHIMA[BUKURO], AND NO ONE OUTSIDE OF PI’IHONUA ITSELF EVER HEARD OF UNSPOKEN/UNTOLD/UNSUNG HENRY SHIMABUKURO BORN 1931, WHO STILL LIVES IN HIS DECEASED MAMA MATSU SHIMABUKURO’S DILAPIDATED PLANTATION BOX HOUSE IN PI’IHONUA CAMP 4!!

    http://online.wsj.com/article/NA_WSJ_PUB:SB10001424052748704388504575419652907636486.html

    By SETH LIPSKY
    It will be hard to find a more overdue newspaper “correction” than that issued last Saturday by the New York Times regarding Gen. John D. Lavelle. The general has been dead since 1979 when, at the age of 62, he died of a heart attack. It could also be said that he died of a broken heart after the New York Times, among others, helped stir a controversy that got him demoted for making unauthorized attacks on North Vietnam.

    The Times’ correction comes after President Barack Obama asked the Senate to restore Lavelle’s rank, posthumously, to four stars. That would right a rush to judgment in a controversy in which, nearly 40 years ago, the Times had fretted about runaway military officers ignoring civilian authority. There were, it turns out, no runaway generals”just runaway critics of the war.

    Newly declassified archival material confirms that the attacks for which the general was demoted were indeed authorized, just as the general had maintained in the years after his retirement. The so-called Lavelle raids may, at first, have ostensibly departed from the rules of engagement at the time. But almost immediately their authorization was clarified”by the highest level of civilian authority, President Richard Nixon.

    The New York Times admits in its correction that editorials it issued in the early 1970s “misstated the role” of Lavelle “in a series of bombing raids of North Vietnam.” The Times faults Nixon for not admitting publicly that he had authorized Lavelle to order pilots to attack the enemy’s anti-aircraft sites even when their radar hadn’t been turned on against U.S. aircraft. Normally, the rules of engagement called for attacking only those sites that had reacted to U.S. aircraft.

    The controversy was started in January 1972 by a sergeant in intelligence, who had access to the pilot reports and wrote a letter to the Senate warning that early after-action reports seemed inaccurate. By the time the letter reached the Senate in March, Nixon had already straightened out the authority. But when Congress alerted the Air Force, the general was recalled and, in April, forced into retirement with a blemish on his record.

    The story became public in May, when antiwar members of Congress and their allies in the press turned the Lavelle affair into a major controversy that extended through the summer.

    Nixon, watching from the White House even before the controversy became public, understood that Lavelle was being done an injustice. This fact was laid out in 2007 in a stunning dispatch in Air Force Magazine by a retired Air Force general, Aloysius Casey, and his son, Patrick Casey, a lawyer who represents the Lavelle family.

    Citing newly released White House audio recordings and once-classified Joint Chiefs of Staff message traffic, the Caseys quote Nixon in February issuing the authority directly to the man in charge in Vietnam, Amb. Ellsworth Bunker. Nixon told Bunker that the military commander in Vietnam, Gen. Creighton Abrams, “can hit SAM sites, period. OK? But he is not to do it with a public declaration. All right? And, if it does get out, to the extent it does, he says it’s a protective reaction strike. He is to describe it as protective reaction. And he doesn’t have to spell it out.”

    “Why the hell did this happen?” the president roared to Henry Kissinger, his national security adviser, after he learned that Lavelle had been cashiered. He made it clear to Mr. Kissinger that he felt the president should have known about “a decision of that magnitude.” “Frankly, Henry,” the president said, “I don’t feel right about our pushing him into this thing and then, and then giving him a bad rap.”

    In September, the Senate took up the decision of whether to punish Lavelle by retiring him at a rank lower than four stars. Nixon felt he was in a devil of a spot”facing the Vietnamese communist regime and their allies abroad, and the swelling peace movement and antiwar press at home. He was also getting set to implement the first Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty, which had just been concluded with the Kremlin, and was in the thick of his opening to communist China, which he had visited in February.

    All in all, Nixon was facing one of the most complex orders of battle that a wartime American president has ever confronted. In the end, he apparently calculated that it was the better part of valor to let the Senate and antiwar press have their way with Lavelle in order to preserve room to maneuver, both on the battlefield and in talks with our most dangerous adversaries.

    Nixon publicly gave up Lavelle at a press conference on June 29, 1972. Asked whether the Lavelle raids affected “any diplomatic negotiations going on at that time” and whether he was concerned that he “apparently” didn’t know about the raids for several months, Nixon replied that the affair did not affect the diplomatic negotiations. Nixon also supported testimony of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Thomas Moorer, who said the raids weren’t technically authorized.

    The president didn’t disclose at the press conference that he had authorized the raids. But he did state that the raids had been “directed against only those military targets which were the areas that were being used for firing on American planes, but since it did exceed authorization, it was proper for him to be relieved and retired.”

    In the end, Lavelle was forced into retirement at the two-star rank of major general. It was a hard”and unjust”fate for him. Now Mr. Obama has asked the Senate to restore the general’s good name and rank, a correction for which his widow and family have worked for years.

    The restoration of Lavelle’s good name is all the more worthy for the fact that it comes as Mr. Obama is escalating a new war in a far-off and difficult theater in which he has already tasted controversy surrounding his own generals and his own rules of engagement. We will see how Mr. Obama’s statesmanship, and that of his aides, stacks up against that of Messrs. Nixon and Kissinger. We will learn how he stands by his own generals as they use their judgment in the fog of war.

    Mr. Lipsky is founding editor of the New York Sun.

    http://searchwarp.com/swa610903-General-John-D-Lavelle-Is-His-Honor-Restored.htm

    John D. Lavelle was a four star, Air Force Gen. during the Vietnam (1972) back when Nixon was President. Gen. Lavelle was scrutinized and investigated against by Congress and the military for secret bombings of the North Vietnam . Once the story was exposed, the Gen. was quickly demoted to Maj. Gen as punishment for issuing such orders. He was ridiculed for a job not well done and was thrown under the bus several times. He was so distraught that he had to retire with the charges against him.

    The twist, as it turns out, is that he in fact was ordered to conduct those secret bombings. It was out of his control. [Nixon's team ergo Kissinger/Laird] actually used him as a scapegoat “¦.

    The baffling discovery of some historical documents proves that the Gen. was innocent. They were discovered by two historians who happened to come across the information mistakenly. There were transcripts of the documents that divulged conversations [about] Gen. Lavelle from Nixon. “I don’t want him to be made a goat, goddamnit,” Nixon told his security advisor on June 14, 1972 before it was exposed. Nixon responded after the Gen.’s demotion, “You, you destroy a man’s career.. Can we do anything now to stop this damn thing?” Unfortunately, it was too late.

    On June 26, 1972, Nixon really was feeling anxious to do something to help the Gen. but instead turned the other cheek. During a press conference, he announced that the attacks were unauthorized and he had no knowledge of the actions. The Gen. was blamed for everything that happened for that case. All he said was that he was following commands from the upper echelon, which was true. After this, an article was written in the Air Force magazine regarding the case. But the folks who wrote discovered something else too. They found audio tapes of Nixon ordering the bombings.

    Bottom line is that Gen. Lavelle, may he rest in peace, suffered through a demotion and public humility for a task that was not “¦ his fault. Orders were given and he followed them”¦ The Gen. suffered and hopefully his name can be honored or restored as a great American or in this case, as a four star General.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/29/opinion/l29lavelle.html

    A General’s Demotion
    Published: August 28, 2010

    The crucial decision maker in the strikes that General Lavelle ordered in 1972 against North Vietnamese air defenses was President Richard M. Nixon.

    I was the general counsel of the Senate Armed Services Committee and oversaw its 1972 investigation. We determined that General Lavelle had exceeded his authority under the written rules of engagement.

    But we did not know that President Nixon had ordered General Lavelle, through Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker, to strike the surface-to-air missile sites at will. In my opinion, the evidence is also clear that General Lavelle neither ordered nor knew of false reporting. Mr. Nixon nonetheless publicly charged General Lavelle with exceeding his orders.

    Had the committee known of Mr. Nixon’s action in 1972, it would have never voted to deny General Lavelle the honor of retiring at the four-star rank he in fact held.

    R. James Woolsey
    Harwood, Md., Aug. 20, 2010

    The writer was director of central intelligence from 1993 to 1995.

    Henry Shimabukuro born 1931 is the first Uchinanchu/Okinawan

    to ascend up the U.S. Air Force chain of command. Henry’s biggest hero,

    Gen. John D. Lavelle 1916-1979, just got vindicated posthumously in one of

    the most vexing dilemmas in military & political history “ civilian authority

    vs. military command structure. An amazing true story. No one outside

    of tiny Pi’ihonua plantation camp ever heard of diminutive Henry. This

    teeny weeny Uchinanchu is a grain of sand from a mighty sea [Freedom's

    Cause].

    http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2007/February%202007/0207tapes.aspx

    http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2006/November%202006/1106lavelle.aspx

    http://online.wsj.com/article/NA_WSJ_PUB:SB10001424052748704388504575419652907636486.html
    All in all, Nixon was facing one of the most complex orders of battle that a wartime American president has ever confronted. In the end, he apparently calculated that it was the better part of valor to let the Senate and antiwar press have their way with Lavelle in order to preserve room to maneuver, both on the battlefield and in talks with our most dangerous adversaries.

    Nixon publicly gave up Lavelle at a press conference on June 29, 1972. Asked whether the Lavelle raids affected “any diplomatic negotiations going on at that time” and whether he was concerned that he “apparently” didn’t know about the raids for several months, Nixon replied that the affair did not affect the diplomatic negotiations. Nixon also supported testimony of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Thomas Moorer, who said the raids weren’t technically authorized.

    The president didn’t disclose at the press conference that he had authorized the raids. But he did state that the raids had been “directed against only those military targets which were the areas that were being used for firing on American planes, but since it did exceed authorization, it was proper for him to be relieved and retired.”

    In the end, Lavelle was forced into retirement at the two-star rank of major general. It was a hard”and unjust”fate for him. Now Mr. Obama has asked the Senate to restore the general’s good name and rank, a correction for which his widow and family have worked for years.

    The restoration of Lavelle’s good name is all the more worthy for the fact that it comes as Mr. Obama is escalating a new war in a far-off and difficult theater in which he has already tasted controversy surrounding his own generals and his own rules of engagement. We will see how Mr. Obama’s statesmanship, and that of his aides, stacks up against that of Messrs. Nixon and Kissinger. We will learn how he stands by his own generals as they use their judgment in the fog of war.
    # Curtis Narimatsu Says:
    September 1st, 2010 at 12:19 pm

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/opinion/01lafortune.html?pagewanted=2&ref=wikileaks

    LAST summer, as the nation’s war effort and attention turned from Iraq to Afghanistan, the new United States commander there, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, insisted that the struggle was not about killing the enemy or capturing ground, but instead a “war of perception.” Given the general’s recent firing, increasing deaths on the battlefield and the release last week of thousands of classified documents by WikiLeaks painting a dismal picture of the war effort, it is clear that we are losing badly in the war of perception.

    I spent two deployments in Afghanistan writing strategic intelligence reports and briefings similar to what WikiLeaks just made public. True, what was leaked is not pleasant reading. Yet there is no question in my mind that the majority of analysts and officers who have served there, despite their political differences, believe not only that we should continue the fight but that we very much need to win it.

    Why, then, have so many Americans come to a different conclusion recently “ including the 114 House members who voted against President Obama’s war-financing bill on Tuesday? I think they fail to understand the complexity and scale of the war effort, which leads to a flawed analysis.

    For example, many have bemoaned the rash of sophisticated attacks in eastern Afghanistan. But allied attention has been focused on the easier fight of evicting the Taliban from the agrarian provinces of the south, not combating the more complex enemy in the east, where insurgent networks capitalize on political and cultural differences that will require an entirely different counterinsurgency strategy.

    Many people also operate from a faulty assumption about the war’s purpose. No matter what we’ve told the Afghans, the true goal of the American-led effort should not be to create a stable, honest government in Kabul. While that would be a great benefit, what’s vital is that we keep in place the robust intelligence and quick-strike military structure we have developed in the country and across the Pakistan border.

    Without these human intelligence collectors, communications experts and small-scale military operations, we would free the Taliban in Pakistan to focus on overthrowing the government in Islamabad. If they were to accomplish that feat, Al Qaeda would be given all the time it needs to reconstitute its network and undertake more attacks against the United States and its allies.

    That said, there may be a benefit from the scrutiny the military is likely to face post-WikiLeaks. There are many problems with the way we are managing this war. Far too often during my deployments “ the first in 2007, the second last year “ I watched as operations were conducted out of logistical convenience rather than necessity. We often had troops avoid Taliban-controlled districts to limit civilian and military casualties. Because of the threat of homemade bombs, soldiers had to dress like Robocop while trying to interact with, and win the trust of, local leaders. And the rules of engagement are now so restrictive that I’m amazed that any insurgents were killed in the last year.

    For years, the Western military’s main focus has been to disrupt the supply lines that provide the insurgents with improvised explosives. This emphasis protects our troops but does little for the Afghan population, specifically creating a secure environment that would allow for economic growth in key cities like Khost, Gardez and Kandahar. This is crucial: if we can’t revive the cities we will never make progress in the countryside, which is the ultimate battleground against the insurgents.

    If we need a model, we should think about what Afghanistan was like in the 1970s. The country functioned relatively well with a weak central government, strong local leadership and a marginalized religious class. The resistance to the Soviet occupation, steeped in radical Islam, overturned that traditional power structure. By the time the Soviets left, the village mullah had a higher social standing than the tribal leader or local political representative. It was not hard to foresee the rise of the Taliban.

    American and Afghan forces dislodged the Taliban government from Kabul in a matter of months, but they have done little to alter the power dynamic across the country. It is the religious figure, not the elected official or tribal elder, who is invariably asked to settle land disputes and other arguments. As I waded through reports from the field in Paktika Province last year, it became apparent that the people turned to Taliban-backed clerics and the Haqqani network, a ruthless terrorist movement allied with the Taliban, as the ultimate arbiters.

    The key to turning around the war will be to change that dynamic. In fact, we must clamp down on the three things the Taliban do particularly well: manipulating the news media, intimidating the rural population and providing shadow governance.

    The Taliban’s media machine runs circles around our public information operations in Afghanistan. Using newspapers, radio broadcasts, the Internet and word of mouth, it puts out messages far faster than we can, exaggerating the effectiveness of its attacks, creating the illusion of a unified insurgency and criticizing the (real and imagined) failings of the Kabul government. To undermine support for United States troops, the Taliban insistently remind the people that America has committed to a withdrawal beginning next summer, they jump on any announcement of our Western allies pulling out troops and they publicize polls that show declining domestic American support for the war.

    To counter the spin, we need to add the Taliban’s top propagandists to the high-value-target list and direct military operations at the insurgents’ media nerve centers. A major reason that people in rural areas are so reluctant to help us is that Taliban propaganda and intimidation have created an atmosphere of fear.

    A second initiative is to bring back the traditional rural power structure. We have to restore the power of the tribal leader, the khan. Afghans are fond of saying that the thing they do best is politics; we must let them do it. This means moving toward a far weaker concept of central government and encouraging local solutions to local problems. American aid should go directly to rural communities rather than to the Karzai government. And we must identify key tribal leaders and local politicians and give them around-the-clock protection with American troops. It’s astonishing how much credibility a village leader can gain simply by not being assassinated.

    Last, we must destroy the credibility of the Taliban’s religious authority. The insurgents’ concept of Islam is objectionable to most Afghans, but there is little alternative, as most clerics who rejected the Taliban have been killed or have fled. While creating a network of more enlightened religious figures to compete with the hard-liners will take time, we could jump-start progress by creating a group of “mobile mullahs” “ well-protected clerics who can travel through rural areas and settle land disputes and other issues. These men should come from the general areas in which they will be performing their duties and be approved by community leaders.

    We may not win General McChrystal’s war of perception, but we cannot afford a military defeat in Afghanistan. A Taliban victory would not only threaten Pakistan’s government, it would provide a dangerous precedent for other looming disaster zones like Yemen. The boot must be kept on the throat of extremism. Yet we do not need to maintain 100,000 troops in Afghanistan or create a sparkling democracy. We simply need to maintain the intelligence structure and military capacity that already exists, and put the power to defeat the insurgents in the hands of the locals.

    Mitchell LaFortune, a former Army sergeant, was an intelligence analyst with the 82nd Airborne Division from 2006 to 2010.

    http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/newsdesk/2010/04/the-wikileaks-video-and-the-rules-of-engagement.html

    There are a number of legal issues that soldiers must consider whenever they use force”a subject I explored in some depth for “The Kill Company,” a story about a war crime that I wrote for The New Yorker last year. (Subscribers can read the full text; others can buy access to the issue.) Here are a few quick legal and command-culture issues that came to mind while I was watching the video shot over Baghdad from an American helicopter in 2007 and released on WikiLeaks today:

    “¢Proportionality. A longstanding feature of the Law of Armed Conflict, which has been incorporated into the Army’s Rules of Engagement, is the concept of proportionality: all military action must be necessary and proportional to a given threat. This means that soldiers cannot legally shoot down a couple of young teenagers who are throwing stones at a tank. It also requires that soldiers judge, sometimes under difficult circumstances, the advantages of an operation against the potential collateral damage. (The advantages must outweigh the estimated loss of civilian life in order to proceed.) There is no written standard for such a judgment, nor could there be; it must be made case by case. In 2006, the Army Counterinsurgency Field Manual, redrafted under the guidance of General David Petraeus, offers some elaboration. “Combatants cannot intend to harm noncombatants, though proportionality permits them to act knowing some noncombatants may be harmed,” the manual explains. “In policing situations, combatants cannot act in any way in which they know bystanders may be harmed.” Proportionality requires that soldiers discriminate between combatants and civilians”an especially difficult thing to do in a counterinsurgency, when threats quickly emerge and recede from the fabric of daily life.

    “¢Positive identification. All soldiers must “positively identify” a person whom they intend to kill as a legitimate combatant. According to the Rules of Engagement, this means that there must be a “reasonable certainty” that the person is displaying hostile intent, or is behaving in a hostile manner, before soldiers may attack. (In rarer circumstances, people can also be killed based on their “status””that is, based on their affiliation with an organization that the military regards to be hostile”though this does not appear to be the case here.) One cannot determine the proportionality of a military operation without first positively identifying the combatants involved.

    “¢Command culture. The authority to use lethal force might rest with a person who is not at the scene of the battle, and so communication up and down the chain of command often plays a vital role in determining when soldiers can fire. On several occasions, the soldiers in the Apache seem to regard the conditions on the ground in the most threatening terms, even when there is limited evidence that this is so. “Have five to six individuals with AK-47s,” they tell the on-scene commander, after identifying only one or two armed people on the street. When the Apache is flying over Saeed Chmargh, while he is wounded and struggling on the pavement, the crew expresses hope that he’ll find a weapon so that they can kill him legally under the Rules of Engagement. But when the van arrives, the Apache crew reports to the commander, “We have individuals going to the scene, looks like possibly uh picking up bodies and weapons.” This is later amended to, simply, “picking up the bodies.” (There are important legal distinctions between the two scenarios.) Later, when requesting permission to fire a Hellfire missile into a building on a crowded street, Crazy Horse 1-8 tells the commander that there are “at least six individuals in that building with weapons” and that they are from a “previous engagement.” But there is also evidence that people without weapons are in the building, after a couple of seemingly unarmed men walk into it. At some point, when contradictory information is relayed, one would expect the commander to stop and ask for more details before granting the authority to demolish a building in a crowded area. The use of a Hellfire missile typically requires a probing collateral-damage assessment.

    “¢The wounded. The video raises a number of interesting questions about the treatment of casualties during an ongoing military operation. On several occasions, the Apache gunner appears to fire rounds into people after there is evidence that they are have either died or are suffering from debilitating wounds. The Rules of Engagement and the Law of Armed Combat do not permit combatants to shoot at people who are surrendering or who no longer pose a threat because of their injuries. What about the people in the van who had come to assist the struggling man on the ground? The Geneva Conventions state that protections must be afforded to people who “collect and care for the wounded, whether friend or foe.” The understanding here is that such people are clearly designated as noncombatants”by wearing a prominently displayed red cross, or red crescent, on their persons, for instance”or who are obviously civilians. A “positively identified” combatant who provides medical aid to someone amid fighting does not automatically lose his status as a combatant, and may still be legally killed.

    http://bearmarketnews.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/wikileaks-collateral-damage-or-life-saving/

    http://www.rferl.org/content/Wikileaks_Afghan_War_Reports_Stir_Debates_On_Journalism_Law/2111395.html
    # Curtis Narimatsu Says:
    September 1st, 2010 at 1:50 pm

    From earthy/compassionate Lori Hasegawa ““

    RE: tiniest grain of sand from a mighty sea”

    Our Vietnam Vets really got the shaft. I didn’t know until I saw the movie “Born on the 4th of July.” I went to Sophia International U in Japan, and there was a Vietnam Vet who had an odd sense of humor, and I remember he tried to make jokes and join in, but no one really seemed to connect with him. I was pretty much a loner as well, and wish that I had been a friend with him.

    Thank you for the info on the two wonderful men. I would never have heard it “¦ had I not read it here. Thank you very much!

    Curt wrote: I dedicate freedom’s cause to our Vietnam War combat veterans. Their prodigal abandon speaks to a core component of human nature not seen in these times “ our soldiers never fell short of courage and compassion, and we recognize our greatest generation of unsung and untold Vietnam War soldiers.

    Of Henry Shimabukuro and Henry’s oyabun/sempai [great leader] John D. Lavelle”“

    Shokan “Jesse” Shima[bukuro] 1901-2002 is our greatest American Nikkei [person of Japanese ancestry worldwide] for restoring America’s faith in our loyal Issei immigrants & their AJA progeny. Jesse’s nephew Henry Shimabukuro born 1931 of Pi’ihonua is the 1st ever Uchinanchu to ascend up the Air Force Command structure, retiring as Col. though he was up for General, to come back to Pi’ihonua to care for Henry’s ailing mama, who is his biggest inspiration. Henry still lives in his deceased mama Matsu’s dilapidated wood batten box house. Henry’s destiny was to restore honor to Henry’s Air Force 2-star Gen. John D. Lavelle 1916-1979, who was demoted from 4-star Gen. in 1972, unprecedented, for trumped-up false charge of unauthorized air strikes in North Vietnam, even though Defense Sec./VP-vetted Mel Laird told Gen. Lavelle in person in 1971 that the rules of engagement require aggressive attack vs. SAM missile sites that could shoot down our jets/air support. Laird commented 3 yrs. ago about Air Force Mag’s 2006 [Curt's note: Wall St. Journal above incorrectly notes discovery of Nixon audio tapes later than actual date via Air Force Magazine contributing writers] discovery of Nixon audio tapes which authorized protective reaction to take out anti-aircraft sites which could be activated under tech canopy to shoot down U.S. fly-by missions. Laird hypocritically had condemned Gen. Lavelle during Gen. Lavelle’s 1972 ouster as Vietnam Air Force Commander for unauthorized air strikes. Yet Laird commented 3 yrs. ago that, in Laird’s own words to Air Force Mag, “New orders permitted hitting anti-aircraft installations and other dangerous targets if spotted on their missions, whether they were activated or not.” JCS Chief Thomas Moorer while in Vietnam even personally approved Gen. Lavelle’s request November 8, 1971 to attack MIG airfield at Dong Hoi. Despite such report, Gen. Lavelle was disgraced and demoted in rank from 4-star to 2-star General, unprecedented. Thence, though 35 yrs. too late in 2007, Mel Laird’s confession fully vindicates Gen. Lavelle. Gen. Lavelle, like Gen. Mark Clark & Clark’s 442nd RCT, & like High Command’s Gen. Omar Bradley, our Soldier’s General, ONLY WANTED TO PROTECT HIS MEN/SQUADRON FIGHTERS!! Destroying Sam missiles was necessary to prevent our aircraft from being destroyed/our men from being killed like sitting ducks. Gen. Lavelle’s dearest friend & subordinate retired Col. Henry Shimabukuro was destined to vindicate/exonerate/absolve Gen. Lavelle & restore honor to Gen. Lavelle & Gen. Lavelle’s family. Air Force Mag published astounding extraordinary revelations in the past 4 yrs. about Gen. Lavelle’s utter crucifixion in the name of politics/CYA[cover your ass][every man for himself], from Nixon [who actually wanted to clear Gen. Lavelle but was persuaded by Laird/Kissinger that to do so could jeopardize our Paris Peace Talks--Laird didn't want to have fingers pointed at Laird] on down to Saigon command “ everyone covered up & expediently fingered Gen. Lavelle, the most caring/compassionate General. “Stir the waters” Biblical but necessary to vindicate our framed-up/crucified/utterly persecuted Gen. Lavelle. Essentially, God’s covenant w/Abraham entailed God’s promise “ “I will bless those who bless you, I will curse those who curse you.” God’s blessed ones include Gen. Lavelle, who died in 1979 at age 62 from a fatal heart attack, no doubt triggered by his disgraced termination from the Air Force. Our country’s top leaders [Nixon/Kissinger/Laird] chose to pass the buck & blamed magnanimous patriot Gen. Lavelle. Kudos to crusader Henry Shimabukuro & his D.C. band of brothers for restoring honor to our hero Gen. Lavelle. Henry Shimabukuro/John D. Lavelle are Jesus’ silent disciples. Love eternally, ““Curt

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/29/opinion/l29lavelle.html
    A General’s Demotion
    Published: August 28, 2010
    The crucial decision maker in the strikes that General Lavelle ordered in 1972 against North Vietnamese air defenses was President Richard M. Nixon.
    I was the general counsel of the Senate Armed Services Committee and oversaw its 1972 investigation. We determined that General Lavelle had exceeded his authority under the written rules of engagement.
    But we did not know that President Nixon had ordered General Lavelle, through Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker, to strike the surface-to-air missile sites at will. In my opinion, the evidence is also clear that General Lavelle neither ordered nor knew of false reporting. Mr. Nixon nonetheless publicly charged General Lavelle with exceeding his orders.
    Had the committee known of Mr. Nixon’s action in 1972, it would have never voted to deny General Lavelle the honor of retiring at the four-star rank he in fact held.
    R. James Woolsey
    Harwood, Md.
    The writer was director of central intelligence from 1993 to 1995.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/12/opinion/12iht-edcarpenter.html?ref=wikileaks

    Collateral Damage Control
    By CHARLI CARPENTER

    According to the founder of Wikileaks, Julian Assange, the Afghan war logs demonstrate the “carnage and squalor of war” and prove that the United States has committed “war crimes” in Afghanistan. A significant number of commentators have taken these two assertions at face value. But in doing so, they mischaracterize existing international law, which actually allows for significant harm to come to civilians in wartime. And they miss the real lesson of the Afghan war logs: that the protection of civilians in conflict zones cannot be achieved without major changes in the definition of “war crimes.”

    Mr. Assange is correct that war generally weighs hard on civilians: They are dismembered, crushed, asphyxiated, eviscerated, buried alive, burned to death and shot. They witness the deaths or mutilation of family members and friends. Their homes are destroyed; they become refugees, and in their displacement they become vulnerable to disease and death from exposure and malnutrition.

    But it’s not true that such acts are necessarily war crimes under existing law. In fact, all are perfectly legal “ so long as governments inflict them by accident, not deliberately, so long as civilians are caught in the cross-fire rather than the cross-hairs. Nothing in international law holds governments accountable for such harms. This is an ethical tragedy, particularly because collateral damage may now be a more serious humanitarian issue than war crimes in some conflict zones.

    Consider the U.S. and its coalition allies. With rare exceptions, U.S. forces have not targeted civilians directly and have taken precautions to avoid loss of civilian life. Yet since 2006, according to the data from the Afghan Conflict Monitor, 35 percent of civilian deaths on average have been attributable to coalition and pro-government forces “ the very militaries aiming to protect civilians against insurgents and rebuild the country “ with the percentage as high as 41 percent in 2007 and 39 percent between January and June of this year.

    The proportion of accidental deaths to intentional targeting by insurgents has fallen recently, according to the latest data, as a result of both tightened rules of engagement on the coalition side and an increase in Taliban attacks. But they have increased in absolute terms. And a 2009 study of civilian deaths in Iraq shows that while civilian males remain by far the likeliest to be the victims of intentional targeting, accidental deaths by precision-munitions or cross-fire are much likelier to be women and children.

    To be sure, the difference between accidentally hitting civilians with not-so-smart bombs and incinerating entire cities, as was customary only 70 years ago, is not to be ignored. And one should not equate mistakes by coalition forces with the intentional brutality meted out to civilians and aid workers by insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Nonetheless, it is fair to ask what level of “regrettable” civilian casualties is actually acceptable in humanitarian terms. Even the most sophisticated weapons have far too high a rate of collateral damage. Analysts at the New America Foundation recently published a data set of casualty reports that shows that at least one third of those killed in “surgical” drone strikes in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas are civilians.

    The humanitarian consequences of such attacks showcase the absence of clear-cut rules on what it means in practice to minimize civilian casualties. An updated set of rules may be needed to fit the nature of today’s wars if a better rate of civilian protection is to be achieved.

    Such rules would need to be worked out by states, but nongovernmental organizations and legal experts have plenty of ideas about what they could look like. For example, governments and human rights organization should re-evaluate what exactly constitutes “excessive” civilian casualties or “all feasible precautions” and determine whether some limits might shrink the gray area between “unfortunate” and “unlawful.” Landmine Action, for example, has called on states to curtail the use of explosive weapons in urban areas.

    States might also consider new rules regarding compensation for collateral damage, just as victims of war crimes are sometimes entitled to reparations. The Campaign for Innocent Victims in Conflict suggests an expectation to this effect could go far toward providing solace to victims but also to reducing casualties in the first place. And certainly, as suggested by the Oxford Research Group, a mechanism should be established to tally the war dead, in order to track who is dying how in military operations worldwide.

    Such re-evaluations of existing humanitarian law may seem unrealistic, but they have often occurred in times of crisis. In the 1970s, for example, when the Additional Protocols to the Geneva Conventions were hashed out, a key concern of governments was to protect civilians from the kinds of intentional attacks they had suffered in World War II. Similarly, the 1998 Statute for the International Criminal Court was an effort to add teeth to the earlier Geneva regime.

    Today, war crimes by governments are declining in part because the original rules were improved upon and are working to influence military doctrine “ even among those governments who never formally signed onto them. But as the Afghan war logs suggest, collateral damage by governments may be increasing in international wars in part because of the absence of such clear-cut rules. It’s time for this to change.

    Charli Carpenter is an associate professor of international relations at the University of Massachusetts and is the author of “Forgetting Children Born of War: Setting the Human Rights Agenda in Bosnia and Beyond.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/09/us/09manning.html?ref=wikileaks

    He spent part of his childhood with his father in the arid plains of central Oklahoma, where classmates made fun of him for being a geek. He spent another part with his mother in a small, remote corner of southwest Wales, where classmates made fun of him for being gay.

    Associated Press
    Pfc. Bradley Manning.
    Then he joined the Army, where, friends said, his social life was defined by the need to conceal his sexuality under “don’t ask, don’t tell” and he wasted brainpower fetching coffee for officers.

    But it was around two years ago, when Pfc. Bradley Manning came here to visit a man he had fallen in love with, that he finally seemed to have found a place where he fit in, part of a social circle that included politically motivated computer hackers and his boyfriend, a self-described drag queen. So when his military career seemed headed nowhere good, Private Manning, 22, turned increasingly to those friends for moral support.

    And now some of those friends say they wonder whether his desperation for acceptance “ or delusions of grandeur “ may have led him to disclose the largest trove of government secrets since the Pentagon Papers.

    “I would always try to make clear to Brad that he had a promising future ahead of him,” said Daniel J. Clark, one of those Cambridge friends. “But when you’re young and you’re in his situation, it’s hard to tell yourself things are going to get better, especially in Brad’s case, because in his past, things didn’t always get better.”

    Blond and barely grown up, Private Manning worked as an intelligence analyst and was based east of Baghdad. He is suspected of disclosing more than 150,000 diplomatic cables, more than 90,000 intelligence reports on the war in Afghanistan and one video of a military helicopter attack “ all of it classified. Most of the information was given to WikiLeaks.org, which posted the war reports after sharing them with three publications, including The New York Times.

    WikiLeaks has defended the disclosure, saying transparency is essential to democracy. The Pentagon has denounced the leaks, saying they put American soldiers and their Afghan allies in grave danger.

    And while that dispute rages on, with the Pentagon having recently demanded that WikiLeaks remove all secret documents from the Internet and hand over any undisclosed materials in its files, Private Manning is being held in solitary confinement at Quantico, Va., under suicide watch.

    Private Manning’s military-appointed lawyer, Maj. Thomas F. Hurley, declined an interview request.

    Much remains unknown about his journey there from Crescent, Okla., the small town where he was born. But interviews with people who know him, along with e-mail exchanges between him and Adrian Lamo, the computer hacker who turned him in, offer some insights into Private Manning’s early years, why he joined the Army and how he came to be so troubled, especially in recent months.

    “I’ve been isolated so long,” Private Manning wrote in May to Mr. Lamo, who turned the chat logs over to the authorities and the news media. “But events kept forcing me to figure out ways to survive.”

    Survival was something Private Manning began learning as a young child in Crescent. His father, Brian Manning, was also a soldier and spent a lot of time away from home, former neighbors recalled. His mother, Susan Manning, struggled to cope with the culture shock of having moved to the United States from her native Wales, the neighbors said.

    One neighbor, Jacqueline Radford, recalled that when students at Private Manning’s elementary school went on field trips, she sent additional food or money to make sure he had something to eat.

    “I’ve always tried to be supportive of him because of his home life,” Ms. Radford said. “I know it was bad, to where he was left to his own, had to fend for himself.”

    At school, Bradley Manning was clearly different from most of his peers. He preferred hacking computer games rather than playing them, former neighbors said. And they said he seemed opinionated beyond his years about politics, religion, and even about keeping religion out of politics.

    In his Bible Belt hometown that he once mockingly wrote in an e-mail had “more pews than people,” Private Manning refused to recite the parts of the Pledge of Allegiance that referred to God or do homework assignments that involved the Scriptures. And if a teacher challenged his views, former classmates said, he was quick to push back.

    “He would get upset, slam books on the desk if people wouldn’t listen to him or understand his point of view,” said Chera Moore, who attended elementary and junior high school with him. “He would get really mad, and the teacher would say, “ËœO.K., Bradley, get out.’ “

    It was something he would hear a lot throughout his life.

    After Private Manning’s parents divorced, he moved with his mother to Haverfordwest, Wales, her hometown, and began a new chapter of isolation. Haverfordwest is several times bigger than Crescent. It is also centuries older, with traditions that run much deeper. A bustling market town, it offered a pace of life that was significantly faster.

    Former students at his school there, Tasker Milward, remembered Private Manning being teased for all sort of reasons. His American accent. His love of Dr Pepper. The amount of time he spent huddled before a computer.

    And then, students began to suspect he was gay.

    Sometimes, former classmates said, he reacted to the teasing by idly boasting about stealing other students’ girlfriends. At other times, he openly flirted with boys. Often, with only the slightest provocation, he would launch into fits of rage.

    “It was probably the worst experience anybody could go through,” said Rowan John, a former classmate who was openly gay in high school. “Being different like me, or Bradley, in the middle of nowhere is like going back in time to the Dark Ages.”

    But life ahead did not immediately brighten for Private Manning. After his troubled high school years, his mother sent him back to Oklahoma to live with his father and his older sister.

    He was hired and quickly fired from a small software company, where his employer, Kord Campbell, recalled him as clean-cut and highly intelligent with an almost innate sense for programming, as well as the personality of a bull in a china shop. Then his father found out he was gay and kicked him out of the house, friends said. Mr. Clark, the Cambridge friend, said Private Manning told him he lived out of his car briefly while he worked in a series of minimum-wage retail jobs.

    He enlisted in the Army in 2007, to try to give his life some direction and to help to pay for college, friends said.

    He was granted a security clearance and trained as an intelligence analyst at Fort Huachuca, Ariz., before being assigned to the Second Brigade 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, N.Y.

    Before being deployed to Iraq, Private Manning met Tyler Watkins, who described himself on his blog as a classical musician, singer and drag queen. A friend said the two had little in common, but Private Manning fell head over heels. Mr. Watkins, who did not respond to interview requests for this article, was a student at Brandeis University. On trips to visit him here in Cambridge, Private Manning got to know many in Mr. Watkins’ wide network of friends, including some who were part of this university town’s tight-knit hacker community.

    Friends said Private Manning found the atmosphere here to be everything the Army was not: openly accepting of his geeky side, his liberal political opinions, his relationship with Mr. Watkins and his ambition to do something that would get attention.

    Although hacking has come to mean a lot of different things, at its core, those who do it say, is the philosophy that information should be free and accessible to all. And Private Manning had access to some of the most secret information on the planet.

    Meanwhile, his military career was anything but stellar. He had been reprimanded twice, including once for assaulting an officer. He wrote in e-mails that he felt “regularly ignored” by his superiors “except when I had something essential, then it was back to “ËœBring me coffee, then sweep the floor.’ “

    And it seems the more isolated he felt in the military “ he wore custom dog tags that said “Humanist,” and friends said he kept a toy fairy wand on his desk in Iraq “ the more he clung to his hacker friends.

    According to Wired magazine, Private Manning told Mr. Watkins last January that he had gotten his hands on a secret video showing a military helicopter attack that killed two Reuters photographers and one Iraqi civilian.

    In a computer chat with Mr. Lamo, Private Manning said he gave the video to WikiLeaks in February. Then, after WikiLeaks released it in April, Private Manning hounded Mr. Watkins about whether there had been any public reaction. “That was one of his major concerns once he’d done this,” Mr. Watkins told Wired. “Was it really going to make a difference?”

    In his computer chats with Mr. Lamo, Private Manning described how he downloaded the video and lip-synched to Lady Gaga as he copied hundreds of thousand of diplomatic cables.

    “Hillary Clinton and several thousand diplomats around the world are going to have a heart attack,” he boasted. But even as he professed a perhaps inflated sense of purpose, he called himself “emotionally fractured” and a “wreck” and said he was “self-medicating like crazy.”

    And as he faces the possibility of a lifetime in prison, some of Private Manning’s remarks now seem somewhat prophetic.

    “I wouldn’t mind going to prison for the rest of my life, or being executed so much,” he wrote, “if it wasn’t for the possibility of having pictures of me plastered all over the world press.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/22/magazine/22FOB-onlanguage-t.html?ref=wikileaks

    By BEN ZIMMER
    Published: August 20, 2010

    When is a leak not a leak? Last month’s release of the Afghan war logs “ tens of thousands of classified documents unveiled by the Web site WikiLeaks “ stretched the semantics of leak to a bursting point.

    “The word “Ëœleak’ just doesn’t seem adequate for a data dump and security breach of this magnitude,” wrote Peter Feaver, a professor of political science at Duke University, in a blog post for Foreign Policy. “This is not so much a leak as a gusher.” Jack Shafer of Slate concurred: “To call the torrent of information about the Afghanistan war released by WikiLeaks a mere leak is to insult the gods of hydrodynamics.”

    Our canonical images of leakiness involve liquid seeping out through small openings in something “ a dripping faucet, a roof letting in rain, a boat with a cracked hull. Physical leaks can be stopped with a patch or some other reinforcement, as when the little Dutch boy plugged that faulty dike with his finger. But political leaks have strayed far from their literal foundation.

    The metaphor of confidential information leakingout is, in fact, an ancient one. In “The Eunuch,” a comedy by the Roman playwright Terence from the second century B.C., one character says of his inability to keep a secret, “I am full of holes, I leak at every point” (“Plenus rimarum sum, hac atque illac perfluo”). In English, blabby talkers (stereotypically women) have been called leaky since the late 17th century. And the phrasal verb leak out has been used for the revelation of secrets since at least 1806, when the British journalist William Cobbett, an advocate for parliamentary reform, wrote, “When any valuable information leaks out, let us note it down.”

    An early glimpse of how leak entered American political vocabulary comes in John C. Frémont’s 1887 memoirs, which recount a political event leading up to the Mexican-American War, when Secretary of State James Buchanan “discovered a leak in his department.” Buchanan needed to patch a leak from below, but by the end of World War II, leaks could just as likely come from above, in the form of information revealed to reporters by high-ranking officials who didn’t want to be identified. As James Reston wrote in a 1946 New York Times dispatch on postwar peace negotiations, “Governments are the only vessels that leak from the top.”

    Reston’s observation rang true with Daniel Schorr, the veteran newsman who died last month at 93. Schorr was an old hand at the leaking game, having reported for CBS News on the damaging disclosures that befell the Nixon administration, from Daniel Ellsberg’s release of the Pentagon Papers to the Watergate secrets passed on to The Washington Post by Mark Felt, known at the time only as Deep Throat. (Nixon’s would-be leak-pluggers, the “plumbers,” only made matters worse, of course.)

    Schorr lost his job at CBS over a leak, which he described in his autobiography, “Staying Tuned,” as “the most tumultuous experience of my career.” In 1976 he received a draft copy of a secret House Intelligence Committee report on illegal C.I.A. and F.B.I. activities, which he in turn leaked to The Village Voice. Schorr was revealed as The Voice’s

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  • Curtis Narimatsu

    Toys and games were seen as idle and playing was discouraged. Girls had additional restrictions placed upon them and were trained from a young age to spin yarn, cook, sew, weave, serve their husbands and bear their children.

    In accordance with Puritan beliefs, the majority of accused “Ëœwitches’ were unmarried or recently widowed land-owning women; according to the law if no legal heir existed upon the owner’s death, title to the land reverted to the previous owner, or (if no previous owner could be determined) to the colony. This made witch-hunting a possible method of acquiring a profitable piece of property.

    http://www.civilwarwomenblog.com/2007/02/sarah-moore-grimke.html
    http://www.pinn.net/~sunshine/whm2000/grimke4.html
    Sarah Grimke
    (1792 ““ 1873) and
    Angelina Grimke Weld
    (1805 ““ 1879)

    http://lifestyle.iloveindia.com/lounge/lucy-stone-biography-9952.html

    http://www.ctlibrary.com/ch/1992/issue33/3321.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abolitionism#History_of_abolition_in_the_United_States

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_%28play%29

    Pygmalion: A Romance in Five Acts (1913) is a play by Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw. Professor of phonetics Henry Higgins makes a bet that he can train a bedraggled Cockney flower girl, Eliza Doolittle, to pass for a duchess at an ambassador’s garden party by teaching her to assume a veneer of gentility, the most important element of which, he believes, is impeccable speech. The play is a sharp lampoon of the rigid British class system of the day and a comment on women’s independence, packaged as a romantic comedy.

    The Pygmalion myth was a popular subject for Victorian era English playwrights, including one of Shaw’s influences, W. S. Gilbert, who wrote a successful play based on the story in 1871, called Pygmalion and Galatea. Shaw also would have been familiar with the burlesque version, Galatea, or Pygmalion Reversed.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_%28mythology%29
    Pygmalion is a legendary figure of Cyprus. Though Pygmalion is the Greek version of the Phoenician royal name Pumayyaton, he is most familiar from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, X, in which Pygmalion was a sculptor who fell in love with a statue he had carved.

    In Ovid’s narrative, Pygmalion was a Cypriot sculptor who carved a woman out of ivory. According to Ovid, after seeing the Propoetides prostituting themselves (more accurately, they denied the divinity of Aphrodite and she thus “Ëœreduced’ them to prostitution), he was “Ëœnot interested in women’, but his statue was so fair and realistic that he fell in love with it. In the vertex, Venus (Aphrodite)’s festival day came. For the festival, Pygmalion made offerings to Venus and made a wish. “I sincerely wished the ivory sculpture will be changed to a real woman.” However, he couldn’t bring himself to express it. When he returned home, Cupid sent by Venus kissed the ivory sculpture on the hand. At that time, it was changed to a beautiful woman. A ring was put on Galatea’s finger. It was Cupid’s ring which made love achieved. Venus granted his wish.

    Pygmalion married the ivory sculpture changed to a woman under Venus’ blessing.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_effect
    The Pygmalion effect, or Rosenthal effect, refers to the phenomenon in which the greater the expectation placed upon people, often children or students and employees, the better they perform. The effect is named after Pygmalion, a Cypriot sculptor in a narrative by Ovid in Greek mythology, who fell in love with a female statue he had carved out of ivory.

    The Pygmalion effect is a form of self-fulfilling prophecy, and, in this respect, people with poor expectations internalize their negative label, and those with positive labels succeed accordingly. Within sociology, the effect is often cited with regards to education and social class.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hayden

    Hayden’s work often addressed the plight of African Americans, usually using his former home of Paradise Valley slum as a backdrop, as he does in the poem Heart-Shape in the Dust. Hayden’s work made ready use of black vernacular and folk speech. Hayden wrote political poetry as well, including a sequence on the Vietnam War.

    On the first poem of the sequence, he said, “I was trying to convey the idea that the horrors of the war became a kind of presence, and they were with you in the most personal and intimate activity, having your meals and so on. Everything was touched by the horror and the brutality and criminality of war. I feel that’s one of the best of the poems.”

    http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/g_l/hayden/life.htm
    Hayden’s command of technique makes possible his innovations both within and against the symbolist tradition. Hayden’s thematic movement from racial or experiential specificity to fundamental commonalities relies heavily upon a symbolic system. The sordid and oppressive nature of black political life (often represented through the slave trade or the Vietnam War) finds synthesis and resolution in the symbolic realm. Thus Cinquez in “Middle Passage,” or the cereus in “Night-Blooming Cereus,” or Bahauallah in “Words in the Mourning Time” offer spiritual emancipation and renewal in a realm over and above the physical and limited. Here Hayden’s faith as a Baha’i is central as it reinforced his belief in “transcendent humanity,” a spiritual or psychic unity of mankind capable of overcoming divisiveness.

    Monet’s “ËœWaterlilies’”

    Today as the news from Selma and Saigon
    poisons the air like fallout,
    I come again to see
    the serene, great picture that I love.

    Here space and time exist in light
    the eye like the eye of faith believes.
    The seen, the known
    dissolve in iridescence, become
    illusive flesh of light
    that was not, was, forever is.

    O light beheld as through refracting tears.
    Here is the aura of that world
    each of us has lost.
    Here is the shadow of its joy.

    http://www.pbs.org/wnet/foolingwithwords/lesson2.html

    As the gook woman howls
    for her boy in the smouldering,
    as the expendable Clean-Cut Boys
    From Decent American Homes
    are slashing off enemy ears for keepsakes;

    as the victories are tallied up
    with flag-draped coffins, plastic bodybags,
    what can I say
    but this, this:

    We must not be frightened nor cajoled
    into accepting evil as deliverance from evil.
    We must go on struggling to be human,
    though monsters of abstraction
    police and threaten us.

    Reclaim now, now renew the vision of
    a human world where godliness
    is possible and man
    is neither gook nigger honkey wop nor kike

    but man

    permitted to be man.

    Through an explicit litany of atrocities, Hayden scrutinizes the contradiction of an honorable America guilty of inconceivable carnage. He then calls for a moral struggle to earn our “humanness.” The “monsters of abstraction” which “police and threaten us” are the conjectural creeds and ideologies which, throughout history, have caused pogroms and genocides, including the racial discrimination he was victim to. Just as Hayden uses physical images to drive his poems, he believes that the concrete expression of any “ism” should manifest itself in a way that unifies rather than destroys.

    Consider the ironies in Hayden’s life. He was born in a ghetto called “Paradise Valley”; he was legally blind yet became a writer. Think of an irony from your own life and write a poem in which you examine it. It may be humorous.

    In addition to Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert Kennedy, Hayden wrote about other great leaders who labored for “this beautiful and terrible thing, needful to man as air.” Hayden wrote about Crispus Attucks, John Brown, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Paul Robeson, Harriet Tubman, Malcolm X, and others. Write a poem about someone you admire who has sacrificed for the benefit of others. Be as specific as you can.

    By Peter E. Murphy

    Robert Hayden (1913 ““ 1980) was one of four poets remembered at the 1998 Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival where Stanley Kunitz and others shared tributes, remembrances, and readings of his work.

    Examine the complex relationship of Hayden’s beliefs, life, and art.
    Articulate themes in Hayden’s poetry.
    Understand how poetic subtlety can be more effective and powerful than overstatement.
    Analyze Hayden’s revision process on selected poems.
    Write and revise their own poems.

    Robert Hayden, the first African-American Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress “ a position now called the U.S. Poet Laureate “ is a writer whose work can enrich the lessons of both English and social studies classes. Not widely known until the last decade of his life, Hayden’s reputation has been increasing as new audiences discover the beauty and strength of his poems. While his remembrances like “Those Winter Sundays” and “The Whipping” are widely anthologized, other poems like “Night, Death, Mississippi,” “Middle Passage,” and “Runagate, Runagate” (about slavery and its consequences) are less well-known and are a wholly original contribution to American literature. Students will be inspired by Hayden’s commitment to a vision of world unity inspired by his belief in the Bahá’í Faith, “where man is permitted to be man” and is not regarded as less human because he is different.

    I dedicate freedom’s cause to our Vietnam War combat veterans. Their prodigal abandon speaks to a core component of human nature not seen in these times “ our soldiers never fell short of courage and compassion, and we recognize our greatest generation of unsung and untold Vietnam War soldiers.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Let_Us_Now_Praise_Famous_Men
    “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men” is a critically praised opus that leapt over the traditional forms and limitations of journalism of the time. By combining factual reportage with passages of literary complexity and poetic beauty, Agee presented a complete picture, an accurate, minutely detailed report of what he had seen coupled with insight into his feelings about the experience and the difficulties of capturing it for a broad audience. In doing so, he created an enduring portrait of a nearly invisible segment of the American population. The title is from a passage in Ecclesiasticus that begins, “Let us now praise famous men, and our fathers that begat us.”

    Although Agee’s and Evans’ work was never published as the intended magazine article, their work has endured in the form in which it finally emerged, a lengthy, highly original book. Agee’s text is part ethnography, part cultural anthropological study, and part novelistic, poetic narrative set in the shacks and fields of Alabama. Evans’ black-and-white photographs, starkly real but also matching the grand poetry of the text, are included as a portfolio, without comment, in the book.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ashbery

    The Oxonian Review summarised his work 2009:

    This past October, the Library of America released John Ashbery’s Collected Poems (1956″“1987), making him the first living poet to be “canonised” in the series. It is a fitting honour for a man whose decades-long reign as one of the high priests of the contemporary American poetry scene has always been something of a paradox. Having received nearly every major award for achievement in the humanities, he continues to incite considerable debate as to whether his poems “mean” anything at all. To read an Ashbery poem with the intent to explicate in the traditional sense is to make a daring, perhaps foolhardy, leap of semantic faith.

    From magnanimous KingLit Ching born 1936, son of our greatest wayfinder, Rev. Hung Wai Ching 1905-2002 ““

    Curtis,

    Thanks for sharing the spiritual walk of Malie, who is a very special and perceptive person. You are a lucky man. KL

    Malie is mindful and attentive to the unspoken of society. For instance, at Hilo’s Home Depot, Malie prompted the floor staff to aid an old man who was trying to hoist a wood plank onto his cart. No one else but Malie focused on this solitary gentry.

    I am indebted to Curtis for making me aware of Dad’s [Hung Wai's] phenomenal impact on AJA history with more widespread ramifications. It is the typical situation of me being too close and seeing only the tree instead of the forest. Thank you Curt! ““KingLit

    The legacy of Hung Wai Ching 1905-2002″

    ******HOW DO YOU ARRIVE AT CALLING HW THE “GREATEST MODERN HAWAII HISTORY MAKER?” [queries herein from KingLit Ching born 1936/replies from me]

    Hawai’i would be a garrison territory based on WWII martial law if Hung Wai had not liberated our

    majority ethnic group buddaheads, who constituted over a third of the population. Hawai’i would be a

    banal backwater colony because we would not have Statehood. As you know, Capitol Hill mega-

    thrusts LBJ/LBJ’s mentor Rayburn got Statehood for us based on our 442 rescue of LBJ’s/Rayburn’s

    native Alamo Lost Battalion, which was all but forsaken for dead had our 442/100th not rescued these

    Texas rangers.

    HOW DID HW’s EFFORTS WITH THE VVV/442ND COMPEL TRUMAN’S MILITARY INTEGRATION? WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY WARREN’S MAKE UP CALL TO AJAs ““ WHAT IS THE LINKAGE? IS THE CONCEPT OF “SEPARATE IS NOT EQUAL” UNIQUE FOR THIS SET OF CIRCUMSTANCES?

    In January 1944 the War Dept. racially integrated the military draft based on the unmatched exploits

    of the 100th Batt. and the superior training of the nascent 442 RCT, both of whom were germinated

    by Hung Wai. KingLit, go to our 100th clubhouse to see Hung Wai’s photo displayed there. LA

    free-wheeler Earl Warren lamented Earl’s backslide to racism amid the Pearl Harbor attack, and

    former Cal. AG Warren, now Cal. Gov. , realized that Earl’s best way to repent for Earl’s racism

    was to vanquish the root of racism, ergo institutionalized separation of races, off the law books/

    legal codes. Earl was no stranger to history and legacy, and almost dementedly strove to clean

    up America as U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice, just as LA free-wheeler Jackie Robinson

    wasn’t going to take cr_p anymore out of the racist military [docile Detroiter Joe Louis

    bailed out Jackie]. There’s something special about LA folks. Plessy v. Ferguson encoded the myth of separate

    but equal, deferring to Capitol Hill’s Confederates/Southern Bloc well over a century ago.

    LA-liberated Earl Warren had seen enough of such ignominy to know better than to be

    a retrograde fuss-pot in the history books. Earl envisioned a positive legacy for himself,

    just as Jackie Robinson said fu_k U to his officers.

    ******SO ARE YOU SAYING THAT AN “ENLIGHTENED” EARL WARREN PUSHED FOR DANNY INOUYE

    AS HUMPHREY’S VP CHOICE IN 1968?

    No, snowball effect started by Earl Warren got LBJ caught up in the momentum

    to liberate the underclasses.

    /Hung Wai’s reachover in ethnic ascension with Hawai’i as microcosm-Truman-Ike-LBJ as affectees of Hung Wai’s infectious American Dream enthralled Chou En Lai “ that such an incongruous poor Southern China farmer descendant like Hung Wai had changed the face of America and the world over (incl. Asia/world economy) forever via egalitarian Social Gospel-Hung Wai’s extraordinary exceptional idealism “ Chou En Lai was a major-secret admirer of American democracy/Japan restored faith in America via Hung Wai’s enablement of buddaheads/kotonks to fulfill their American Dream “

    *****HOW WOULD CHOU EN LAI FIND OUT ABOUT HW? EDGAR SNOW? KOJI ARIYOSHI? HAVE YOU EVER SPOKEN TO KOJI ABOUT HW? I KNOW HE WAS OVERWHELMINGLY GRATEFUL FOR HIS SCHOLARSHIP TO GEORGIA WHICH HE ATTRIBUTES TO HW.

    Chou’s dearest friend lived in Hawai’i and extolled about the American Dream, which is how Chou

    was mindful of Hawai’i as the specimen culture of ethnic/class democracy. Edgar/Koji were

    PR ploys in Mao’s demented scheme to lord over Mao’s teeming masses. As you know, Chou

    nearly was eliminated for opposing Mao’s psycho madness. Koji’s son Roger effused about Hung Wai being Koji’s

    greatest hero, but Koji had to shut up vs. radical left because Hung Wai was a Joe Farrington

    GOP [as you know, Ichiro Izuka railed vs. Jack Hall because of Hall's endorsement of Statehood

    Joe -- Izuka's indictment resulted in the Reluctant Thirty-Nine/Hawai'i Seven convictions].

    JOHN TSUKANO’S WIFE KNEW A JAPANESE NATIONAL BUSINESS WOMAN WHO MADE THIS OBSERVATION ABOUT HW. I WONDER WHO ORIGINATED THIS IDEA?

    Chou En Lai, the sharpest Nipponphile/Anglophile, who lived in/knew Japan like the

    back of his hand. To Chow, Hung Wai’s legacy was too insane to be true, but surely

    enough it was true “ only in America could such freedom prophesize eventual

    occurrence/result. Japan’s post-WWII legal system duplicated the U.S. paradigm,

    thence Hung Wai’s exemplar/reprise in modern Japan.

    So when I was w/my best friends last week on their Mission in O’okala, we stopped by at a home in which the wife is a Mormon but was on her work shift as R.N. at Hilo Hospital. Her husband and another O’okala neighbor fella, whose wife also is Mormon, jibber-jabbered with no pretensions at all, no pretense being good. The other neighbor fella stopped by in his truck on his way to the store just after we got there when he saw us talking story in the shade of the avocado tree on a beautiful weekday morning. And these 2 fellas started to jibber-jabber about their little worlds :-) And I mused to myself about the portagee joke about the 2 portagee talking heads a la William Faulkner’s “The Sound and the Fury” “ the 1st portagee frets about his morning constipation “ “Ohhh, da pain in my ass, sowaaaa”¦.” The uhduh portagee says, “Koodeej, I get up at 8 dis monin 4 piss, den I get up a 9 4 take 1 sh_t!!” Da 1st portagee asks, “What da problem, den???” Da uhduh portagee says, “But Munwell, I get up at 10 4 wake up!!” :-) Ohhh boy, da sound & da fury out of the Faulknerian woods!! Plenteh like dem buggas, baby!! :-) Oblivion :-)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sound_and_the_Fury#Literary_significance_and_reception
    The novel has achieved great critical success and a prominent place among the greatest of American novels. It played a role in William Faulkner’s receiving the 1949 Nobel Prize in Literature.

    The novel’s appreciation has in large part been due to the technique of its construction, Faulkner’s ability to recreate the thought patterns of the human mind. It was an essential development in the stream-of-consciousness narrative technique.

    Like much of Faulkner’s work, The Sound and the Fury has been read as typifying the South as a whole. Faulkner was very much preoccupied with the question of how the ideals of the old South could be maintained or preserved in the post-Civil War era. Seen in this light, the decline of the Compson family might be interpreted as an examination of the corrosion of traditional morality, only to be replaced by a modern helplessness.

    There are also echoes of existential themes in the novel, as Sartre argued in his famous essay on Faulkner. Many of the characters also draw upon classical, Biblical and literary sources: Some believe Quentin (like Darl in As I Lay Dying) to have been inspired by Hamlet and Caddy by Ophelia. Benjamin may derive his name from the brother of Joseph in the Book of Genesis.

    Immediately obvious is the notion of a “tale told by an idiot”, in this case Benjy, whose view of the Compsons’ story opens the novel. The idea can be extended also to Quentin and Jason, whose narratives display their own varieties of idiocy. The last line is, perhaps, the most meaningful; Faulkner said in his speech upon being awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature that people must write about things that come from the heart, “universal truths”. Otherwise they signify nothing.

    #

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/opinion/views/os-ed-kathleen-parker-082910-20100830,0,3055811.column

    I thank erudite Lori Hasegawa for the Ralph Lazo
    story.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stand_Up_for_Justice:_The_Ralph_Lazo_Story
    # Curtis Narimatsu Says:
    August 31st, 2010 at 11:54 am

    On magnanimous Lori Hasegawa ““

    Curt to Lori Hasegawa
    subject: Lori’s authenticity

    Hi Lori:

    What makes you knowledgeable about Japanese Americans outside of Hawai’i?

    Were you raised in Hawai’i, and if not, then where?

    If I were to inscribe your hypothetical headstone, what would it say in one sentence? [example, "She was a good daughter, wife, mother, & grandma"]

    I sense your authenticity/realness.

    You’re quite different from local folks. Thanks for the Lazo story. ““Curt

    Hi Curt,

    I am not knowledgeable”¦ I just have an interest because I was so moved by the exhibit at the Japanese American National Museum in LA about 10 years ago. Until then, I had no clue about the WWII Japanese American internment camps and how unfair it was. I couldn’t understand why the Japanese community in LA would have their own basketball leagues and why they always stuck together”¦ then I also found out about the detention camps in Hawai’i “¦.and when I hear the stories about how everyone endured and suffered and yet were so brave”¦ I love the Japanese spirit”¦ I am proud of Japanese history and roots (I studied in Japan for a couple of years) I always think they just don’t make’em like they used to. They were all heroes”¦ one year my mom and I had a table at the JACL convention, and we met the nicest people and I discovered that there was injustice in Peru as well”¦. AH, but I guess there is injustice all over the world”¦. I always want to get involved, but I have discovered that I don’t always follow thru on what I would like to do.

    Oh sorry to digress”¦ born and raised in Wahiawa”¦ live in Mililani”¦ enjoy working with everyone from the big island”¦

    Right now, my headstone would be something like”¦.. She was always searching for a way to heal pain and suffering”¦. Never thought of a headstone”¦ could have been a better everything”¦ not a grandma yet”¦ but I will be a good grandma”¦ whenever that happens”¦ Used to laugh at all the beauty contestant answers about World Peace”¦ but now.. I think “¦ that is what I would like”¦ Aloha,

    Lori

    [Curt's endnote: Lori exemplifies tremendous
    courage & compassion -- Lori is
    quite the original/unique/special
    one you look for in a leader whose
    energy/presence are of "felt
    necessity" in our time, per Oliver
    Wendell Holmes]
    # Curtis Narimatsu Says:
    August 31st, 2010 at 1:24 pm

    From prescient Lori Hasegawa ““

    Curt,

    Just bought a Dalai Lama book and someone gave me a copy of Honda Sensei’s workbook. Hope to develop some ki/qi. Just received some spring forest Qigong CDs which I am lending to a friend who is ill. Just had a discussion recently that all true religions have the same teaching”¦. Love One Another”¦. And if we all love, we will all have peace.

    Which reminds me that I have to send out an email regarding Peace Day Parade and Festival “¦..

    Peace Out! :-)

    Lori

    From Curt:

    Malie is steeped in wisdom & composure. An acolyte of both Dalai Lama & Qigong sensei Honda, Malie describes both role models as lotus blossoms [rise above the muck of the human condition].

    Malie’s resonant line is “What do I know?!” The greatest leaders always keep check of their strengths/weaknesses via this query.

    Apply Malie’s
    dynamo duo bone-rattler queries, 1) “What is the higher Truth here?” [serve
    God by serving humanity, just as 1997 movie "Titanic" DiCaprio's Jack embraced the lowest of
    the low of society -- outcasts/unwashed-unwanted]; 2) “What, if any, is
    the ultimate disguised blessing?” [by serving others, you encourage them
    to love and not fear anyone/anything]. Malie 1) processes and 2) integrates
    accordingly. Only love endures. It’s love, it’s all love [elderly lady at the
    Ganges river in India who exuded "It's love, it's all love" to Malie].

    As Malie says, authenticity is not narcissism or self-centeredness.
    It is a fluid transparency of self in all we do and with all whom we love.
    Thus the great paradox: When we share ourselves authentically, those
    with whom we share find themselves confronted with an invitation to be
    themselves, too. They find their authentic story in the sharing of our own.
    Thus the gift of self or the gift of presence.

    Buddhism eliminates suffering, Christianity eliminates sin, Islam eliminates selfish pride [bow down to the ground]. Buddhism nails abject poverty, Christianity nails lifestyle, and Islam nails abuse. Poverty ameliorated via Eastern meditation, sin averted via 10 Commandments/code of behavior, abuse averted via proper instruction. Thence, patience an Eastern ideal, abstinence from vice a Western ideal, harmony a Muslim ideal.
    Christian backslides of personal narcissism/amplified guilt, form over function, judging a book by its cover, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorian_Gray_syndrome
    # Curtis Narimatsu Says:
    September 1st, 2010 at 10:02 am

    http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2010/08/04/obama-clears-gen-lavelles-record/

    Obama Clears Gen. Lavelle’s Record.
    By Julian E. Barnes

    The Obama administration announced today that it was going to make a correction to a historical footnote of the Vietnam War, clearing the record of the late Air Force Gen. John D. Lavelle.

    President Barack Obama posthumously nominated the controversial Vietnam-era Air Force commander for reinstatement to the rank of general.

    Lavelle, the former commander of the Seventh Air Force, was forced to retire as a major general because of a controversy over whether he was authorized to liberalize the rules of engagement, making it easier for bomber pilots to hit targets in North Vietnam.

    In 1971, Lavelle authorized U.S. aircraft to fire on targets in North Vietnam even if not directly fired upon, assuming that air defense systems were targeting the American aircraft. After accusations arose that the military had falsified intelligence reports to make it seem like the aircraft had been fired upon, the Air Force investigated.

    Lavelle had said he was unaware of the false data, but was ultimately accused of filing false reports and conducting unauthorized bombing raids. He countered that Defense Secretary Melvin Laird had told him to follow a liberal interpretation of the rules of engagement.

    As the controversy grew, the Pentagon forced Lavelle to retire. Because appointments above major general are considered temporary, Congress must directly authorize any retirements at a higher grade. The Air Force recommended Lavelle be retired at as a lieutenant general, a three-star rank. After a long Senate investigation, the Senate Armed Services Committee turned down that recommendation, and Lavelle was retired as a two-star major general.

    Lavelle continued to maintain his actions were authorized until his death in 1979.

    The Nixon tapes and other information declassified in 2007 changed the picture. Tapes made by President Richard Nixon showed that he had authorized Laird and Lavelle to attack targets in North Vietnam without direct provocation. “You don’t have to wait till they fire before you fire back,” Nixon said in one tape. “Remember I told Laird that. And I meant it.”

    In a statement, the Pentagon said the declassified information made clear that Lavelle’s actions were authorized, and that his name should be cleared.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_us_vietnam_general

    Obama restores rank of disgraced Vietnam general

    In this 1972 file photo, Gen. John D. Lavelle, right, talks with then Senate Armed Services Committee

    By PAULINE JELINEK and ROBERT BURNS, Associated Press
    WASHINGTON ““ More than 30 years after his death, an Air Force general has been exonerated of charges that he violated presidential restrictions on aerial bombing during the Vietnam War and that he ordered the falsification of records to conceal the missions.

    John D. Lavelle was forced to retire in April 1972 at the rank of major general “ two stars below the rank he held as commander of air operations in Vietnam “ after being relieved of duty for ordering unauthorized airstrikes against North Vietnamese military targets.

    He maintained his innocence during congressional hearings held after his dismissal.

    He died in 1979.

    The story took a new twist in 2007 with the publication in Air Force Magazine of an article by a retired Air Force general, Aloysius Casey, and his son, Patrick Casey. They used declassified documents and transcripts of President Richard Nixon’s Oval Office audio tapes to show that Nixon had secretly authorized more aggressive bombing in North Vietnam in February 1972.

    The Caseys also wrote that such attacks had been authorized in late 1971 and early 1972 by top U.S. officers, including Adm. Thomas H. Moorer, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Army Gen. Creighton T. Abrams, the overall U.S. military commander in South Vietnam.

    Lavelle’s family petitioned the Air Force to correct his record and restore his rank. It said the decision in 1972 to relieve him of duty was based on “woefully incomplete” evidence.

    The family’s legal petition to the Air Force said the Nixon tapes show that “he was a “Ëœscapegoat’ and in fact had acted within the authority expressly granted to him by the president and communicated to him through classified communications between the chief of Pacific Command, the secretary of defense and others.”

    A copy of the petition and other legal documents in the case were obtained by The Associated Press on Wednesday.

    In 2008 the Air Force Board for the Correction of Military Records found no evidence that Lavelle caused, directly or indirectly, the falsification of records or that he was even aware of their existence.

    The board also agreed with the family’s assertion that the 1972 decision had been based on incomplete information and that the White House and others withheld important facts.

    “After thoroughly reviewing the evidence of record and noting the applicant’s contentions, we find sufficient evidence the retirement grade in which the member was nominated was the result of material error “ an incomplete record,” the board concluded.

    It added: “It is clear the White House, the Department of Defense and the Joint Chiefs of Staff all possessed evidence which, if released, would have exonerated him.”

    In a written statement Wednesday, the Air Force said its board found that once Lavelle learned about the falsified reports “ which pertained to false claims of hostile fire by North Vietnamese forces “ he took action to ensure that the practice was stopped.

    The Air Force board recommended, in light of the new information, that Lavelle be reinstated to the rank of general. Defense Secretary Robert Gates endorsed the recommendation and President Barack Obama has asked the Senate to confirm Lavelle to the rank of general.

    The Lavelle family issued a statement Wednesday praising the decision to exonerate the general.

    “The president’s nomination is a major milestone in the effort to publicly restore General Lavelle’s outstanding record of military service, his honor and his good name,” it said.

    Lavelle’s widow, Mary Jo Lavelle, 91, thanked all involved.

    “Jack was a good man, a good husband, a good father and a good officer,” she said. “I wish he was alive to hear this news.”

    Shokan “Jesse” Shima[bukuro] 1901-2002 is our greatest American Nikkei [person of Japanese ancestry worldwide] for restoring America’s faith in our loyal Issei immigrants & their AJA progeny. Jesse’s nephew Henry Shimabukuro born 1931 of Pi’ihonua is among the 1st ever AJAs/Uchinanchu to ascend up the Air Force Command structure, retiring as Col. though he was up for General, to come back to Pi’ihonua to care for Henry’s ailing mama, who is his biggest inspiration. Henry’s destiny was to restore honor to Henry’s Air Force 2-star Gen. John D. Lavelle 1916-1979, who was demoted from 4-star Gen. in 1972, unprecedented, for trumped-up false charge of unauthorized air strikes in North Vietnam, even though Defense Sec./VP-vetted Mel Laird told Gen. Lavelle in person in 1971 that the rules of engagement require aggressive attack vs. SAM missile sites that could shoot down our jets/air support. Laird commented 3 yrs. ago about Air Force Mag’s 2006 [Curt's note: Wall St. Journal above incorrectly notes discovery of Nixon audio tapes later than actual date via Air Force Magazine contributing writers] discovery of Nixon audio tapes which authorized protective reaction to take out anti-aircraft sites which could be activated under tech canopy to shoot down U.S. fly-by missions. Laird hypocritically had condemned Gen. Lavelle during Gen. Lavelle’s 1972 ouster as Vietnam Air Force Commander for unauthorized air strikes. Yet Laird commented 3 yrs. ago that, in Laird’s own words to Air Force Mag, “New orders permitted hitting anti-aircraft installations and other dangerous targets if spotted on their missions, whether they were activated or not.” JCS Chief Thomas Moorer while in Vietnam even personally approved Gen. Lavelle’s request November 8, 1971 to attack MIG airfield at Dong Hoi. Despite such report, Gen. Lavelle was disgraced and demoted in rank from 4-star to 2-star General, unprecedented. Thence, though 35 yrs. too late in 2007, Mel Laird’s confession fully vindicates Gen. Lavelle. Gen. Lavelle, like Gen. Mark Clark & Clark’s 442nd RCT, & like High Command’s Gen. Omar Bradley, our Soldier’s General, ONLY WANTED TO PROTECT HIS MEN/SQUADRON FIGHTERS!! Destroying Sam missiles was necessary to prevent our aircraft from being destroyed/our men from being killed like sitting ducks. Gen. Lavelle’s dearest friend & subordinate retired Col. Henry Shimabukuro was destined to vindicate/exonerate/absolve Gen. Lavelle & restore honor to Gen. Lavelle & Gen. Lavelle’s family. Air Force Mag published astounding extraordinary revelations in the past 4 yrs. about Gen. Lavelle’s utter crucifixion in the name of politics/CYA[cover your ass][every man for himself], from Nixon [who actually wanted to clear Gen. Lavelle but was persuaded by Laird/Kissinger that to do so could jeopardize our Paris Peace Talks--Laird didn't want to have fingers pointed at Laird] on down to Saigon command “ everyone covered up & expediently fingered Gen. Lavelle, the most caring/compassionate General. “Stir the waters” Biblical but necessary to vindicate our framed-up/crucified/utterly persecuted Gen. Lavelle. Essentially, God’s covenant w/Abraham entailed God’s promise “ “I will bless those who bless you, I will curse those who curse you.” God’s chosen ones include Gen. Lavelle, who died in 1979 at age 62 from a fatal heart attack, no doubt triggered by his disgraced termination from the Air Force. Our country’s top leaders [Nixon/Kissinger/Laird] passed the buck & blamed magnanimous patriot Gen. Lavelle. Kudos to crusader Henry Shimabukuro & his D.C. band of brothers for restoring honor to our hero Gen. Lavelle. Henry Shimabukuro/John D. Lavelle are Jesus’ silent disciples. Love eternally, ““Curt

    ENDNOTE: IMAGINE, NO ONE OUTSIDE OF PI’IHONUA CAMP 4 EVER HEARD OF SHOKAN “JESSE” SHIMA[BUKURO], AND NO ONE OUTSIDE OF PI’IHONUA ITSELF EVER HEARD OF UNSPOKEN/UNTOLD/UNSUNG HENRY SHIMABUKURO BORN 1931, WHO STILL LIVES IN HIS DECEASED MAMA MATSU SHIMABUKURO’S DILAPIDATED PLANTATION BOX HOUSE IN PI’IHONUA CAMP 4!!

    http://online.wsj.com/article/NA_WSJ_PUB:SB10001424052748704388504575419652907636486.html

    By SETH LIPSKY
    It will be hard to find a more overdue newspaper “correction” than that issued last Saturday by the New York Times regarding Gen. John D. Lavelle. The general has been dead since 1979 when, at the age of 62, he died of a heart attack. It could also be said that he died of a broken heart after the New York Times, among others, helped stir a controversy that got him demoted for making unauthorized attacks on North Vietnam.

    The Times’ correction comes after President Barack Obama asked the Senate to restore Lavelle’s rank, posthumously, to four stars. That would right a rush to judgment in a controversy in which, nearly 40 years ago, the Times had fretted about runaway military officers ignoring civilian authority. There were, it turns out, no runaway generals”just runaway critics of the war.

    Newly declassified archival material confirms that the attacks for which the general was demoted were indeed authorized, just as the general had maintained in the years after his retirement. The so-called Lavelle raids may, at first, have ostensibly departed from the rules of engagement at the time. But almost immediately their authorization was clarified”by the highest level of civilian authority, President Richard Nixon.

    The New York Times admits in its correction that editorials it issued in the early 1970s “misstated the role” of Lavelle “in a series of bombing raids of North Vietnam.” The Times faults Nixon for not admitting publicly that he had authorized Lavelle to order pilots to attack the enemy’s anti-aircraft sites even when their radar hadn’t been turned on against U.S. aircraft. Normally, the rules of engagement called for attacking only those sites that had reacted to U.S. aircraft.

    The controversy was started in January 1972 by a sergeant in intelligence, who had access to the pilot reports and wrote a letter to the Senate warning that early after-action reports seemed inaccurate. By the time the letter reached the Senate in March, Nixon had already straightened out the authority. But when Congress alerted the Air Force, the general was recalled and, in April, forced into retirement with a blemish on his record.

    The story became public in May, when antiwar members of Congress and their allies in the press turned the Lavelle affair into a major controversy that extended through the summer.

    Nixon, watching from the White House even before the controversy became public, understood that Lavelle was being done an injustice. This fact was laid out in 2007 in a stunning dispatch in Air Force Magazine by a retired Air Force general, Aloysius Casey, and his son, Patrick Casey, a lawyer who represents the Lavelle family.

    Citing newly released White House audio recordings and once-classified Joint Chiefs of Staff message traffic, the Caseys quote Nixon in February issuing the authority directly to the man in charge in Vietnam, Amb. Ellsworth Bunker. Nixon told Bunker that the military commander in Vietnam, Gen. Creighton Abrams, “can hit SAM sites, period. OK? But he is not to do it with a public declaration. All right? And, if it does get out, to the extent it does, he says it’s a protective reaction strike. He is to describe it as protective reaction. And he doesn’t have to spell it out.”

    “Why the hell did this happen?” the president roared to Henry Kissinger, his national security adviser, after he learned that Lavelle had been cashiered. He made it clear to Mr. Kissinger that he felt the president should have known about “a decision of that magnitude.” “Frankly, Henry,” the president said, “I don’t feel right about our pushing him into this thing and then, and then giving him a bad rap.”

    In September, the Senate took up the decision of whether to punish Lavelle by retiring him at a rank lower than four stars. Nixon felt he was in a devil of a spot”facing the Vietnamese communist regime and their allies abroad, and the swelling peace movement and antiwar press at home. He was also getting set to implement the first Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty, which had just been concluded with the Kremlin, and was in the thick of his opening to communist China, which he had visited in February.

    All in all, Nixon was facing one of the most complex orders of battle that a wartime American president has ever confronted. In the end, he apparently calculated that it was the better part of valor to let the Senate and antiwar press have their way with Lavelle in order to preserve room to maneuver, both on the battlefield and in talks with our most dangerous adversaries.

    Nixon publicly gave up Lavelle at a press conference on June 29, 1972. Asked whether the Lavelle raids affected “any diplomatic negotiations going on at that time” and whether he was concerned that he “apparently” didn’t know about the raids for several months, Nixon replied that the affair did not affect the diplomatic negotiations. Nixon also supported testimony of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Thomas Moorer, who said the raids weren’t technically authorized.

    The president didn’t disclose at the press conference that he had authorized the raids. But he did state that the raids had been “directed against only those military targets which were the areas that were being used for firing on American planes, but since it did exceed authorization, it was proper for him to be relieved and retired.”

    In the end, Lavelle was forced into retirement at the two-star rank of major general. It was a hard”and unjust”fate for him. Now Mr. Obama has asked the Senate to restore the general’s good name and rank, a correction for which his widow and family have worked for years.

    The restoration of Lavelle’s good name is all the more worthy for the fact that it comes as Mr. Obama is escalating a new war in a far-off and difficult theater in which he has already tasted controversy surrounding his own generals and his own rules of engagement. We will see how Mr. Obama’s statesmanship, and that of his aides, stacks up against that of Messrs. Nixon and Kissinger. We will learn how he stands by his own generals as they use their judgment in the fog of war.

    Mr. Lipsky is founding editor of the New York Sun.

    http://searchwarp.com/swa610903-General-John-D-Lavelle-Is-His-Honor-Restored.htm

    John D. Lavelle was a four star, Air Force Gen. during the Vietnam (1972) back when Nixon was President. Gen. Lavelle was scrutinized and investigated against by Congress and the military for secret bombings of the North Vietnam . Once the story was exposed, the Gen. was quickly demoted to Maj. Gen as punishment for issuing such orders. He was ridiculed for a job not well done and was thrown under the bus several times. He was so distraught that he had to retire with the charges against him.

    The twist, as it turns out, is that he in fact was ordered to conduct those secret bombings. It was out of his control. [Nixon's team ergo Kissinger/Laird] actually used him as a scapegoat “¦.

    The baffling discovery of some historical documents proves that the Gen. was innocent. They were discovered by two historians who happened to come across the information mistakenly. There were transcripts of the documents that divulged conversations [about] Gen. Lavelle from Nixon. “I don’t want him to be made a goat, goddamnit,” Nixon told his security advisor on June 14, 1972 before it was exposed. Nixon responded after the Gen.’s demotion, “You, you destroy a man’s career.. Can we do anything now to stop this damn thing?” Unfortunately, it was too late.

    On June 26, 1972, Nixon really was feeling anxious to do something to help the Gen. but instead turned the other cheek. During a press conference, he announced that the attacks were unauthorized and he had no knowledge of the actions. The Gen. was blamed for everything that happened for that case. All he said was that he was following commands from the upper echelon, which was true. After this, an article was written in the Air Force magazine regarding the case. But the folks who wrote discovered something else too. They found audio tapes of Nixon ordering the bombings.

    Bottom line is that Gen. Lavelle, may he rest in peace, suffered through a demotion and public humility for a task that was not “¦ his fault. Orders were given and he followed them”¦ The Gen. suffered and hopefully his name can be honored or restored as a great American or in this case, as a four star General.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/29/opinion/l29lavelle.html

    A General’s Demotion
    Published: August 28, 2010

    The crucial decision maker in the strikes that General Lavelle ordered in 1972 against North Vietnamese air defenses was President Richard M. Nixon.

    I was the general counsel of the Senate Armed Services Committee and oversaw its 1972 investigation. We determined that General Lavelle had exceeded his authority under the written rules of engagement.

    But we did not know that President Nixon had ordered General Lavelle, through Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker, to strike the surface-to-air missile sites at will. In my opinion, the evidence is also clear that General Lavelle neither ordered nor knew of false reporting. Mr. Nixon nonetheless publicly charged General Lavelle with exceeding his orders.

    Had the committee known of Mr. Nixon’s action in 1972, it would have never voted to deny General Lavelle the honor of retiring at the four-star rank he in fact held.

    R. James Woolsey
    Harwood, Md., Aug. 20, 2010

    The writer was director of central intelligence from 1993 to 1995.

    Henry Shimabukuro born 1931 is the first Uchinanchu/Okinawan

    to ascend up the U.S. Air Force chain of command. Henry’s biggest hero,

    Gen. John D. Lavelle 1916-1979, just got vindicated posthumously in one of

    the most vexing dilemmas in military & political history “ civilian authority

    vs. military command structure. An amazing true story. No one outside

    of tiny Pi’ihonua plantation camp ever heard of diminutive Henry. This

    teeny weeny Uchinanchu is a grain of sand from a mighty sea [Freedom's

    Cause].

    http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2007/February%202007/0207tapes.aspx

    http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2006/November%202006/1106lavelle.aspx

    http://online.wsj.com/article/NA_WSJ_PUB:SB10001424052748704388504575419652907636486.html
    All in all, Nixon was facing one of the most complex orders of battle that a wartime American president has ever confronted. In the end, he apparently calculated that it was the better part of valor to let the Senate and antiwar press have their way with Lavelle in order to preserve room to maneuver, both on the battlefield and in talks with our most dangerous adversaries.

    Nixon publicly gave up Lavelle at a press conference on June 29, 1972. Asked whether the Lavelle raids affected “any diplomatic negotiations going on at that time” and whether he was concerned that he “apparently” didn’t know about the raids for several months, Nixon replied that the affair did not affect the diplomatic negotiations. Nixon also supported testimony of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Thomas Moorer, who said the raids weren’t technically authorized.

    The president didn’t disclose at the press conference that he had authorized the raids. But he did state that the raids had been “directed against only those military targets which were the areas that were being used for firing on American planes, but since it did exceed authorization, it was proper for him to be relieved and retired.”

    In the end, Lavelle was forced into retirement at the two-star rank of major general. It was a hard”and unjust”fate for him. Now Mr. Obama has asked the Senate to restore the general’s good name and rank, a correction for which his widow and family have worked for years.

    The restoration of Lavelle’s good name is all the more worthy for the fact that it comes as Mr. Obama is escalating a new war in a far-off and difficult theater in which he has already tasted controversy surrounding his own generals and his own rules of engagement. We will see how Mr. Obama’s statesmanship, and that of his aides, stacks up against that of Messrs. Nixon and Kissinger. We will learn how he stands by his own generals as they use their judgment in the fog of war.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/opinion/01lafortune.html?pagewanted=2&ref=wikileaks

    LAST summer, as the nation’s war effort and attention turned from Iraq to Afghanistan, the new United States commander there, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, insisted that the struggle was not about killing the enemy or capturing ground, but instead a “war of perception.” Given the general’s recent firing, increasing deaths on the battlefield and the release last week of thousands of classified documents by WikiLeaks painting a dismal picture of the war effort, it is clear that we are losing badly in the war of perception.

    I spent two deployments in Afghanistan writing strategic intelligence reports and briefings similar to what WikiLeaks just made public. True, what was leaked is not pleasant reading. Yet there is no question in my mind that the majority of analysts and officers who have served there, despite their political differences, believe not only that we should continue the fight but that we very much need to win it.

    Why, then, have so many Americans come to a different conclusion recently “ including the 114 House members who voted against President Obama’s war-financing bill on Tuesday? I think they fail to understand the complexity and scale of the war effort, which leads to a flawed analysis.

    For example, many have bemoaned the rash of sophisticated attacks in eastern Afghanistan. But allied attention has been focused on the easier fight of evicting the Taliban from the agrarian provinces of the south, not combating the more complex enemy in the east, where insurgent networks capitalize on political and cultural differences that will require an entirely different counterinsurgency strategy.

    Many people also operate from a faulty assumption about the war’s purpose. No matter what we’ve told the Afghans, the true goal of the American-led effort should not be to create a stable, honest government in Kabul. While that would be a great benefit, what’s vital is that we keep in place the robust intelligence and quick-strike military structure we have developed in the country and across the Pakistan border.

    Without these human intelligence collectors, communications experts and small-scale military operations, we would free the Taliban in Pakistan to focus on overthrowing the government in Islamabad. If they were to accomplish that feat, Al Qaeda would be given all the time it needs to reconstitute its network and undertake more attacks against the United States and its allies.

    That said, there may be a benefit from the scrutiny the military is likely to face post-WikiLeaks. There are many problems with the way we are managing this war. Far too often during my deployments “ the first in 2007, the second last year “ I watched as operations were conducted out of logistical convenience rather than necessity. We often had troops avoid Taliban-controlled districts to limit civilian and military casualties. Because of the threat of homemade bombs, soldiers had to dress like Robocop while trying to interact with, and win the trust of, local leaders. And the rules of engagement are now so restrictive that I’m amazed that any insurgents were killed in the last year.

    For years, the Western military’s main focus has been to disrupt the supply lines that provide the insurgents with improvised explosives. This emphasis protects our troops but does little for the Afghan population, specifically creating a secure environment that would allow for economic growth in key cities like Khost, Gardez and Kandahar. This is crucial: if we can’t revive the cities we will never make progress in the countryside, which is the ultimate battleground against the insurgents.

    If we need a model, we should think about what Afghanistan was like in the 1970s. The country functioned relatively well with a weak central government, strong local leadership and a marginalized religious class. The resistance to the Soviet occupation, steeped in radical Islam, overturned that traditional power structure. By the time the Soviets left, the village mullah had a higher social standing than the tribal leader or local political representative. It was not hard to foresee the rise of the Taliban.

    American and Afghan forces dislodged the Taliban government from Kabul in a matter of months, but they have done little to alter the power dynamic across the country. It is the religious figure, not the elected official or tribal elder, who is invariably asked to

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  • Curtis Narimatsu

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/19/books/19read.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1

    By MICHIKO KAKUTANI
    Published: January 18, 2009

    WASHINGTON “ In college, as he was getting involved in protests against the apartheid government in South Africa, Barack Obama noticed, he has written, “that people had begun to listen to my opinions.” Words, the young Mr. Obama realized, had the power “to transform”: “with the right words everything could change -” South Africa, the lives of ghetto kids just a few miles away, my own tenuous place in the world.”

    A Reading List That Shaped a President

    Much has been made of Mr. Obama’s eloquence “ his ability to use words in his speeches to persuade and uplift and inspire. But his appreciation of the magic of language and his ardent love of reading have not only endowed him with a rare ability to communicate his ideas to millions of Americans while contextualizing complex ideas about race and religion, they have also shaped his sense of who he is and his apprehension of the world.

    Mr. Obama’s first book, “Dreams From My Father” (which surely stands as the most evocative, lyrical and candid autobiography written by a future president), suggests that throughout his life he has turned to books as a way of acquiring insights and information from others “ as a means of breaking out of the bubble of self-hood and, more recently, the bubble of power and fame. He recalls that he read James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright and W. E. B. Du Bois when he was an adolescent in an effort to come to terms with his racial identity and that later, during an ascetic phase in college, he immersed himself in the works of thinkers like Nietzsche and St. Augustine in a spiritual-intellectual search to figure out what he truly believed.

    As a boy growing up in Indonesia, Mr. Obama learned about the American civil rights movement through books his mother gave him. Later, after his stint as a fledgling community organizer in Chicago, he found inspiration in “Parting the Waters,” the first installment of Taylor Branch’s multivolume biography of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    More recently, books have supplied Mr. Obama with some concrete ideas about governance: it’s been widely reported that “Team of Rivals,” Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book about Abraham Lincoln’s decision to include former opponents in his cabinet, informed Mr. Obama’s decision to name his chief Democratic rival, Hillary Rodham Clinton, as Secretary of State. In other cases, books about F. D. R.’s first hundred days in office and Steve Coll’s “Ghost Wars,” about Afghanistan and the C.I.A., have provided useful background material on some of the myriad challenges Mr. Obama will face upon taking office.

    Mr. Obama tends to take a magpie approach to reading “ ruminating upon writers’ ideas and picking and choosing those that flesh out his vision of the world or open promising new avenues of inquiry.

    His predecessor, George W. Bush, in contrast, tended to race through books in competitions with Karl Rove (who recently boasted that he beat the president by reading 110 books to Mr. Bush’s 95 in 2006), or passionately embrace an author’s thesis as an idée fixe. Mr. Bush and many of his aides favored prescriptive books “ Natan Sharansky’s “Case for Democracy,” which pressed the case for promoting democracy around the world, say, or Eliot A. Cohen’s “Supreme Command,” which argued that political strategy should drive military strategy. Mr. Obama, on the other hand, has tended to look to non-ideological histories and philosophical works that address complex problems without any easy solutions, like Reinhold Niebuhr’s writings, which emphasize the ambivalent nature of human beings and the dangers of willful innocence and infallibility.

    What’s more, Mr. Obama’s love of fiction and poetry “ Shakespeare’s plays, Herman Melville’s “Moby-Dick” and Marilynne Robinson”Ëœs “Gilead” are mentioned on his Facebook page, along with the Bible, Lincoln’s collected writings and Emerson’s “Self Reliance” “ has not only given him a heightened awareness of language. It has also imbued him with a tragic sense of history and a sense of the ambiguities of the human condition quite unlike the Manichean view of the world so often invoked by Mr. Bush.

    Mr. Obama has said that he wrote “very bad poetry” in college and his biographer David Mendell suggests that he once “harbored some thoughts of writing fiction as an avocation.” For that matter, “Dreams From My Father” evinces an instinctive storytelling talent (which would later serve the author well on the campaign trail) and that odd combination of empathy and detachment gifted novelists possess. In that memoir, Mr. Obama seamlessly managed to convey points of view different from his own (a harbinger, perhaps, of his promises to bridge partisan divides and his ability to channel voters’ hopes and dreams) while conjuring the many places he lived during his peripatetic childhood. He is at once the solitary outsider who learns to stop pressing his nose to the glass and the coolly omniscient observer providing us with a choral view of his past.

    As Baldwin once observed, language is both “a political instrument, means, and proof of power,” and “the most vivid and crucial key to identity: it reveals the private identity, and connects one with, or divorces one from, the larger, public, or communal identity.”

    For Mr. Obama, whose improbable life story many voters regard as the embodiment of the American Dream, identity and the relationship between the personal and the public remain crucial issues. Indeed, “Dreams From My Father,” written before he entered politics, was both a searching bildungsroman and an autobiographical quest to understand his roots “ a quest in which he cast himself as both a Telemachus in search of his father and an Odysseus in search of a home.

    Like “Dreams From My Father,” many of the novels Mr. Obama reportedly admires deal with the question of identity: Toni Morrison’s “Song of Solomon” concerns a man’s efforts to discover his origins and come to terms with his roots; Doris Lessing’s “Golden Notebook” recounts a woman’s struggles to articulate her own sense of self; and Ellison’s “Invisible Man” grapples with the difficulty of self-definition in a race-conscious America and the possibility of transcendence. The poems of Elizabeth Alexander, whom Mr. Obama chose as his inaugural poet, probe the intersection between the private and the political, time present and time past, while the verse of Derek Walcott (a copy of whose collected poems was recently glimpsed in Mr. Obama’s hands) explores what it means to be a “divided child,” caught on the margins of different cultures, dislocated and rootless perhaps, but free to invent a new self.

    This notion of self-creation is a deeply American one “ a founding principle of this country, and a trope addressed by such classic works as “The Great Gatsby” “ and it seems to exert a strong hold on Mr. Obama’s imagination.

    In a 2005 essay in Time magazine, he wrote of the humble beginnings that he and Lincoln shared, adding that the 16th president reminded him of “a larger, fundamental element of American life “ the enduring belief that we can constantly remake ourselves to fit our larger dreams.”

    A Reading List That Shaped a President

    Though some critics have taken Mr. Obama to task for self-consciously italicizing parallels between himself and Lincoln, there are in fact a host of uncanny correspondences between these two former Illinois state legislators who had short stints in Congress under their belts before coming to national prominence with speeches showcasing their eloquence: two cool, self-contained men, who managed to stay calm and graceful under pressure; two stoics embracing the virtues of moderation and balance; two relatively new politicians who were initially criticized for their lack of experience and for questioning an invasion of a country that, in Lincoln’s words, was “in no way molesting, or menacing the U.S.”

    As Fred Kaplan’s illuminating new biography (“Lincoln: The Biography of a Writer”) makes clear, Lincoln, like Mr. Obama, was a lifelong lover of books, indelibly shaped by his reading “ most notably, in his case, the Bible and Shakespeare “ which honed his poetic sense of language and his philosophical view of the world. Both men employ a densely allusive prose, richly embedded with the fruit of their reading, and both use language as a tool by which to explore and define themselves. Eventually in Lincoln’s case, Mr. Kaplan notes, “the tool, the toolmaker, and the tool user became inseparably one. He became what his language made him.”

    The incandescent power of Lincoln’s language, its resonance and rhythmic cadences, as well as his ability to shift gears between the magisterial and the down-to-earth, has been a model for Mr. Obama “ who has said he frequently rereads Lincoln for inspiration “ and so, too, have been the uses to which Lincoln put his superior language skills: to goad Americans to complete the unfinished work of the founders, and to galvanize a nation reeling from hard times with a new vision of reconciliation and hope.

    From erudite KingLit Ching born 1936, son of our greatest modern historymaker Rev. Hung Wai Ching 1905-2002: Union Theological Seminary is the bastion of liberal intellectual theology including Paul Tillich, Karl Barth and Martin Buber (I heard Tillich speak while at Harvard but couldn’t understand him due to his thick German accent). Yale is the bastion of the Congregationalist. I like David Brooks but I doubt that you do (New York Times). Brook’s recount of his conversation with Obama speaks volumes of Obama’s intellect, moral compass, and commitment to serve. I do not agree with Brook’s view of Obama’s Hawai’i experience because both Hawaii and Punahou school are racist (or at least subtly so ““ condescending, no true recognition and respect for Blacks). [KingLit's only son Chris is half African-American, half of KingLit's Punti Chinese]

    Obama’s Southside Chicago experience was nearly perfect training to be a political and social realist and pragmatist. I am the advocate of “fighting fire with fire” because I am a hawk and believe in having a military capability to ensure that our Christian and democratic ways of life are never taken away from us. Obama is a political pragmatist. The Karl Rove Republicans are masters of dirty tricks (do you know who Rove idolizes? You would be appalled). Obama can usually get his way with the Republicans.

    David Remnick’s “The Bridge” explains Obama’s New England vision for the world. Niebuhr and his ilk can be compared to the great Christian existentialist Soren Kierkegaard who believed that a man’s beliefs creates the meaning of his own existence. Fyodor Dostoevsky is the Russian equivalent.

    Interesting that Curtis Narimatsu has such an intense interest in Hung Wai and can make these kinds of observations ““ “alter ego is Niebuhr?” Curtis can do it because he has been a student of Hung Wai’s achievements. King Lit
    P.S. This kind of a discussion makes me melancholy [KingLit ambivalent about Dad Hung Wai, who never shared Dad's past w/Hung Wai's kids]

    From Curt:
    As Professor Dan Kwok is queried, I’ll say 2 things here: 1) Barack Obama’s affinity w/2nd generation [Missouri] German-American Reinhold Niebuhr [major anti-Nazi from Hitler's inception] goes back before Obama’s Columbia U days [Columbia sister school of Niebuhr's Union Theological Seminary], to 2) Niebuhr’s Serenity Prayer. Yes, Niebuhr’s/our ubiquitous Serenity Prayer lifted Obama like no other, just as Niebuhr personally lifted our greatest modern Hawai’i historymaker, Hung Wai Ching 1905-2002 [Kamehameha the Great is our greatest ancient historymaker][Hung Wai averted mass internment of our 160,000 buddaheads WWII/formed 100th-442nd AJA fighting units/compelled Truman's military integration/mused over Ike's point to get Earl Warren appointed as U.S. S.Ct. Chief Justice in return for California Gov./LA native son Warren's support of Ike's Presidential candidacy 1953 vs. Ohio's Bob Taft (as we surmise Waihee's Moon over question of Moon getting Waihee appointed as BE trustee)/compelled Earl Warren's make-up call to AJAs via Warren's Brown v. Bd. of Education greatest case in U.S. history -- separate is not equal!! -- Warren actually an LA solo joe/free-wheeling individualist a la LA's Jackie Robinson (broke baseball race barrier)-- LA gang very inclusive--no racist baggage -- West Coast version of free-spirited Emmett Till/compelled Ike's nascent Civil Rights Act/compelled LBJ's landmark Civil Rights Act/LBJ seriously urged Humphrey to pick Hung Wai's boy Dan Inouye as Humphrey's '68 VP choice!!/Hung Wai's reachover in ethnic ascension with Hawai'i as microcosm-Truman-Ike-LBJ as affectees of Hung Wai's infectious American Dream enthralled Chou En Lai -- that such an incongruous poor Southern China farmer descendant like Hung Wai had changed the face of America and the world over (incl. Asia/world economy) forever via egalitarian Social Gospel-Hung Wai's extraordinary exceptional idealism -- Chou En Lai was a major-secret admirer of American democracy/Japan restored faith in America via Hung Wai's enablement of buddaheads/kotonks to fulfill their American Dream " thence post-WWII Japan's incredible economic recovery-standard of living materially/etc.]. BTW, MLK was THE major follower of Niebuhr. But Hung Wai preceded MLK as Niebuhr’s acolyte, just as Malcolm X preceded MLK in consciousness/spiritual growth with regard to the international quality of “everybody’s equal,” that people of color the world over far outnumber Whites, so that MLK’s beseechment of America’s White Middle Class for civil rights chagrins diverse internationalist inclusionaries like Malcolm X & Nelson Mandela. Malcolm X told MLK, “Hey, people of color outnumber White people by 10 to 1 “ we’re talking about the world, not the U.S.!! Why are Blacks a minority?? Blacks are in the majority!! Civil rights?? How about human rights for people of color throughout the whole world??!!” Yes, Plains GA. Jimmy Carter capitalized on Malcolm X “ human rights trans-national.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_Rizal
    Jose Mercado Rizal 1861-1896

    Jose Mercado Rizal’s advocacy of institutional reforms by peaceful means rather than by violent revolution makes him Asia’s first modern non-violent proponent of political reforms. Forerunner of Gandhi and contemporary of Tagore and Sun Yat Sen, all four created a new climate of thought throughout Asia, leading to the attrition of colonialism and the emergence of new Asiatic nations by the end of World War II. Rizal’s appearance on the scene came at a time when European colonial power had been growing and spreading, mostly motivated by trade, some for the purpose of bringing Western forms of government and education to peoples regarded as backward. Coinciding with the appearance of those other leaders, Rizal from an early age had been enunciating in poems, tracts and plays, ideas all his own of modern nationhood as a practical possibility in Asia. In the Noli he stated that if European civilization had nothing better to offer, colonialism in Asia was doomed. Such was recognized by Gandhi who regarded him as a forerunner in the cause of freedom. Jawaharlal Nehru, in his prison letters to his daughter Indira, acknowledged Rizal’s significant contributions in the Asian freedom movement. These leaders regarded these contributions as keystones and acknowledged Rizal’s role in the movement as foundation layer.

    Rizal, through his reading of Morga and other western historians, knew of the genial image of Spain’s early relations with his people. In his writings, he showed the disparity between the early colonialists and those of his day, with the latter’s atrocities giving rise to Gomburza and the Philippine Revolution of 1896. His biographer, Austin Coates, and writer, Benedict Anderson, believe that Rizal gave the Philippine revolution a genuinely national character; and that Rizal’s patriotism and his standing as one of Asia’s first intellectuals have inspired others of the importance of a national identity to nation-building.

    Although his field of action lay in politics, Rizal’s real interests lay in the arts and sciences, in literature and in his profession as an ophthalmologist. Shortly after his death, the Anthropological Society of Berlin met to honor him with a reading of a German translation of his farewell poem and Dr. Rudolf Virchow delivering the eulogy.

    Rafael Palma, contends that the revolution of Bonifacio is a consequence wrought by the writings of Rizal and that although the Bonifacio’s revolver produced an immediate outcome, the pen of Rizal generated a more lasting achievement.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9s_Bonifacio

    Andrés Bonifacio y de Castro (November 30, 1863 ““ May 10, 1897) was a Filipino nationalist and revolutionary. He was a founder and leader of the Katipunan movement which sought the independence of the Philippines from Spanish colonial rule and started the Philippine Revolution. He is considered a de facto national hero of the Philippines. Bonifacio is also considered by some Filipino historians to be the first president of the Philippines, but he is not officially recognized as such.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emilio_Aguinaldo

    Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy (March 22, 1869 ““ February 6, 1964) was a Filipino general, politician, and independence leader. He played an instrumental role during the Philippines’ revolution against Spain, and the subsequent Philippine-American War that resisted American occupation.

    Aguinaldo became the Philippines’ first President. He was also the youngest (at age 29) to have become the country’s president, and the longest-lived (having survived to age 94).

    Conflict between the Magdalo and another Cavite Katipunan faction, the Magdiwang, led to Bonifacio’s intervention in the province. The Cavite rebels then made overtures about establishing a revolutionary government in place of the Katipunan. Though Bonifacio already considered the Katipunan to be a government, he acquiesced and presided over elections held during the Tejeros Convention in Tejeros, Cavite on March 22, 1897. Away from his power base, Bonifacio lost the leadership to Aguinaldo, and was elected instead to the office of Secretary of the Interior. Even this was questioned by an Aguinaldo supporter, claiming Bonifacio had not the necessary schooling for the job. Insulted, Bonifacio declared the Convention null and void, and sought to return to his power base in Morong (present-day Rizal). He and his party were intercepted by Aguinaldo’s men and violence resulted which left Bonifacio seriously wounded. Bonifacio was charged, tried and found guilty of treason by a Cavite military tribunal, and sentenced to death. After some vacillation, Aguinaldo confirmed the death sentence, and Bonifacio was executed on May 10, 1897 in the mountains of Maragondon in Cavite, even as Aguinaldo and his forces were retreating in the face of Spanish assault.

    Hisashi Koshimoto 1894-1935 Onomea native, kibei, became the father of Japan baseball, long before Wahiawa’s Bozo Wakabayashi set foot in Japan. Just the same, Onomea’s Masa Koike knew of Koshimoto’s legacy & is to O’ahu AJA baseball what antecedent Koshimoto was to Japan baseball. Irony is that Onomea archivists Tadao Okimoto 1919-1993 & Tadao’s son Ken born 1952 knew nothing of either Koshimoto or Koike.

    The Billy Blanchette saga 1996 to integrate AJA baseball, the only remaining game in town, so to speak, would spell the doom of the once-flourishing AJA league, per Masa Koike, where buddahead ethnic pride/tradition coalesced to continue AJA ball. Of course, Blanchette was talked out of suing for integration at public ballparks.

    Elmer Davis 1890-1958 was among the great reporters of the 20th century, astride Edward R. Murrow 1908-1965. Davis ID’d w/the down & outers of society, namely, Jack Dempsey, Billy Sunday, David [vs. Goliath], & of all improbables, the 442 RCT, who regard Davis as the messiah who lockstepped w/Hung Wai Ching for combat formation of the 100th/442, & who revulsed at re-classifying Nisei/2nd generation U.S. citizens as “enemy aliens.”

    Ike’s youngest brother Milt Eisenhower 1899-1985 & Dillon Myer 1891-1982 as internment heads WWII actually were beneficent to Nikkei internees, both empathetic because of their agriculture backdrops/specialties [kotonks were farmers, relegated to rural expanses by social/racial stratification].

    Ellis Zacharias 1890-1961 was Japan-phile who taught Cecil Coggins ONI WWII counter-espionage that Nikkei here were loyal Americans. Zacharias was instrumental in forming the 442 RCT for combat duty.

    Army G-2 counter-espionage Moses Pettigrew/Rufus Bratton were great supporters of our Nikkei as loyal Americans. Moses had commanded Nisei here in 1938, before WWII, just as Wooch Fielder did w/our 298th National Guard pre-WWII. Moses & Wooch were our greatest proponents for combat formation of Nisei soldiers, Moses being the first military man to propose this, in early 1942, on top of Hung Wai Ching’s exhortation to military leaders immediately after the Pearl Harbor bombing for combat formation of our Nisei soldiers.

    Yes, Zacharias was southern Jew like Advertiser’s George Chaplin. Zacharias was isolated from his contempos because of his stance vs. Admiral Kimmel Pearl Harbor incident.

    Walter Victor’s magnanimity: Our greatest-ever youth enabler Walter Victor paid for tuition for his St. Joseph School athletes. Contrary to public opinion, as current guru Don Pakele born 1944 clarifies, St. Joseph School started giving tuition waivers only during Don Pakele’s era & after, ergo long after Walter Victor died.

    No, Don Pakele’s era as coach 3 decades ago, not Don’s era as outstanding athlete 1962. Don is among the rarest few of our prepsters who converted from hoops center at 6’3″³ St. Joseph High to point guard in college ball. Don a legend amongst us, both in sports and life. Don a big fan of PeeWee Kai’s coaching brains, Kai 4 yrs. older than Don. PeeWee is politico whiz Keoki Kai’s dad, Keoki born 1965 Waiakea High ’83 and California’s U of Pacific alumnus.

    From resplendently heartful Steven Kalas ““
    http://www.lvrj.com/living/nfl-star-embraces-life-by-shining-his-light-on-others-101249919.html

    Did you happen to see Emmitt Smith’s Aug. 13 acceptance speech as a member of the class of 2010 NFL Hall of Fame? It moved me. Put a lump in my throat. And to think: The only time I ever root for the Dallas Cowboys is when they are playing the Minnesota Vikings in what I fondly call The Antipathy Bowl. Mostly I hope for them to beat each other into oblivion.

    But I recognize class when I see it.

    Class? Emmitt’s speech revealed so much more than that. The NFL’s all-time rushing leader was nakedly authentic. Inspired. His speech contained the dance partners I admire most: gratitude and humility. Oh, how these two things do dance! It’s beautiful to watch.

    Emmitt shared the stage with the other inductees, the same way he shares his life. Then he shared the stage “¦ with everybody. He was grateful for his employers. His coaches. His teammates. Grateful for the fans of football and fans of the Cowboys. And then he turned his attention to family.

    His father. His mother. His brothers and sisters. His cousins. Emmitt even addressed his father-in-law, saying, “I will continue to do everything in my power to keep your daughter, and my wife, safe and happy.” See, I’m a guy who is rather “Old World” and traditional. I love this. When a father puts his daughter’s hand into another man’s hand at a wedding altar, he surrenders his greatest treasure. And a good man never forgets the sober duty thus conveyed, or his gratitude for the man who conveyed it.

    Then a pause in Emmitt’s speech. He looked down, steeling himself. Gathering himself emotionally. And, as if psychically, the audience knew what was coming. Felt it. “Mooooooose” came the cry, bathing the arena in love, in warmth, in appreciation. Emmitt asked Daryl Johnston to stand.

    Daryl, aka “Moose,” No. 48. A fullback who ended his career with more passing receptions than carries. Daryl has three Super Bowl rings. Daryl will never be in the Hall of Fame. All he did, Sunday after Sunday, was plow the way for Emmitt Smith to be Emmitt Smith. He shined his light on Emmitt, without grudge or complaint, sacrificing his body. Sacrificing personal glory. Come to think of it, it seems there was nothing Daryl wouldn’t sacrifice to do his job.

    And Emmitt, eyes filled with tears, voice trembling, soul gaping “ gratitude takes us apart “ thanked Daryl. And because he did, and because of the way he did it, something about the whole universe was better.

    See, the capacity for gratitude is itself humility. Gratitude and humility ultimately dance as One. The only people who can say “thank you” are people who have learned of dependence and interdependence. Which means people who have traded in the equation of what they deserve for the celebration of what they have. Because, if you will look closely, you will find there is no consistent relationship between merit and treasure. No consistent relationship between blessings and deservedness. The best of life is often not a result of what we deserve, and thank God for that! When I reflect seriously on what I deserve, I mostly want to go hide.

    For Emmitt Smith, it seems there is no such thing as personal glory. Glory is not something he grasps after, possesses or owns. Emmitt’s glory is not about Emmitt. Rather, his glory pours through him like light through a prism, showering a rainbow on everyone around him.

    Especially when he shares the light and shines the light on those whose lives shined a light on him.

    You don’t have to be an inductee to the Hall of Fame to live like Emmitt Smith. Who has shined a light on you? Who in your history regularly walked off the stage to make room for you to stand there? Who relentlessly poured their lives into your own just because it made them smile to see you happy, thriving and victorious? Can you see their faces? Can you feel their love?

    Call them. Right now. And be grateful.

    My great poli-sci prof Beatrice Markey 1913-1980 ““

    http://scua.sdsu.edu/exhibits/highlights/2003/02/index.shtml

    Beatrice Markey: First Black Faculty Member
    Though her stay here was too brief it was nonetheless historic. In the fall of 1956, Beatrice Markey arrived as assistant professor of political science having just completed requirements for the doctorate in public administration at the University of Southern California with the help of a Hayes Foundation fellowship. Normally, The Aztec mentioned new faculty at the start of the academic year in a perfunctory manner with no fanfare whatsoever, but in Markey’s case the editors took the unusual step of announcing here arrival with a headlined article and, just in case readers might miss the point that she was black because the article tactfully avoided specifying her race, they included a full-face photo of her worth more than a thousand words. Unfortunately, by 1958 the 45-year-old professor was teaching at the University of Hawaii at Hilo, having had little impact on the school and soon forgotten. Beatrice Markey died in Hilo in 1980.

    Rose Aquai 1902-2003 was my 5th grade teacher at Ha’aheo Elem. School in Wainaku. Rose was a benevolent despot, holding reign over us via her Kapoho swimming pool as a reward to kids who were obedient/kowtowed to her. Popular kids like Randy Shimooka/Grace Shimasaki/Arnie Singson were swooned by her to have us follow their lead, so to speak. I revulsed at the this Faustian bargain. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faustian_bargain

    A deal with the Devil, pact with the Devil, or Faustian bargain is a cultural motif widespread in the West, best exemplified by the legend of Faust and the figure of Mephistopheles, but elemental to many Christian folktales. In the Aarne-Thompson typological catalog, it lies in category AT 756B ““ “The devil’s contract.”

    According to traditional Christian belief in witchcraft, the pact is between a person and Satan or any other demon (or demons); the person offers his or her soul in exchange for diabolical favors. Those favors vary by the tale, but tend to include youth, knowledge, wealth, or power. It was also believed that some persons made this type of pact just as a sign of recognizing the Devil as their master, in exchange for nothing. Regardless, the bargain is a dangerous one, for the price of the Fiend’s service is the wagerer’s soul. The tale may have a moralizing end, with eternal damnation for the foolhardy venturer. Conversely it may have a comic twist, in which a wily peasant outwits the Devil, characteristically on a technical point.

    Any apparently superhuman achievement might be credited to a pact with the Devil, from the numerous European Devil’s Bridges to the superb violin technique of Niccolò Paganini.

    The term “a pact with the Devil” is also used metaphorically to condemn a person or persons perceived as having collaborated with an evil person or regime. An example of this is the still-controversial case of Rudolf Kastner in Israel, in which the term was used in reference to Kastner’s alleged collaboration with Adolf Eichmann during the Holocaust in 1944 Hungary. According to some, the term served to inflame public hatred against Kastner, culminating in his assassination.

    Rose Aquai versed herself sole proprietress over Ha’aheo School, and gave hell to principal Violet Henry born 1907 [centenarian like Rose was]. Violet was the Dr. Jekyll to Rose’s Mr. Hyde.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Kastner#Descendents

    Assassination

    Kastner compared the verdict against him to the Dreyfus affair. He resigned his government position and started working for the Israeli Hungarian-language newspaper Új Kelet. On March 3, 1957 he was killed outside his house by Ze’ev Eckstein (who pulled the trigger), Dan Shemer and Yosef Menkes. All three were former members of the pre-state right-wing militia Lehi; Menkes, their leader, had also been a member of the post-independence terrorist group Kingdom of Israel. Kastner died of his injuries twelve days later. Eckstein, 24, stated he killed Kastner to avenge his activities in conjunction with Nazi figures such as Adolf Eichmann. During the trial it turned out that Eckstein had been a paid informer of the Israeli General Security Service a few months before the shooting. But the idea that the killing was a government conspiracy has been described as “absolute nonsense” by some because the head of the intelligence service was a close personal friend of Kastner. Kastner’s killers were pardoned seven years into their life sentences. In January 1958 the Supreme Court of Israel overturned most of the judgment against Kastner, stating that the lower court had “erred seriously”.

    Descendents

    His daughter Zsuzsa lives in Tel Aviv where she works as a hospital nurse. She has three daughters, including Merav Michaeli, a well-known radio and television presenter in Israel. Zsuzsa and Merav attended the formal presentation of the Kastner archive to Yad Vashem in 2007. Zsuzsa lectured about her father in Britain in 2008.

    Documentary

    The feature-length theatrical documentary Killing Kasztner was released in Israel and the UK in 2009 and the United States in October 2009. The director of the film is Gaylen Ross.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreyfus_affair

    Antisemitism and birth of Zionism

    The Hungarian-Jewish journalist Theodor Herzl had been assigned to report on the trial and its aftermath. Soon afterward, Herzl wrote Der Judenstaat (The Jewish State, 1896) and founded the World Zionist Organization, which called for the creation of a Jewish State in Palestine. The antisemitism and injustice revealed in France by the conviction of Alfred Dreyfus had a radicalizing effect on Herzl, persuading him that Jews, despite the Enlightenment and Jewish assimilation, could never hope for fair treatment in European society. While the Dreyfus affair was not Herzl’s initial motivation, it did much to encourage his Zionism.

    In the Middle East, the Muslim Arab press was sympathetic to the falsely accused Captain Dreyfus, and criticized the persecution of Jews in France.

    Not all Jews saw the Dreyfus Affair as evidence of antisemitism in France, however. It was also viewed as the opposite. The Jewish philosopher Emmanuel Lévinas often cited the words of his father: “A country that tears itself apart to defend the honor of a small Jewish captain is somewhere worth going.”

    Former athlete/stud Roy Roberts 1904-1998 was Ah Chew Goo’s big hero/coach, Ah Chew born 1918 our irascible greatest passer in hoops history, Ah Chew alter ego/mentor of Pistol Pete Maravich, greatest passer in NBA history [Ah Chew preceded birth of the NBA], Roy Hilo High ’34 coach Territorial titlists, the last coach before Beans Afook’s reign [Ah Chew despised Ah Fook 1900-1991, a traditionalist who shut down Ah Chew's razzle dazzle style, which is today's uptempo NBA game]. Former athlete/stud Toma Tasaki born 1907 was Ah Chew’s playground coaching guru. Toma’s girlfriend was Tai On Chock’s older sister.

    Look at the tremendous positive influence Miles Carey had on his McKinley High kids like Toma Tasaki ““
    http://books.google.com/books?id=68hia28eEC4C&pg=PA156&lpg=PA156&dq=toma+tasaki&source=bl&ots=f-mihy8zO5&sig=ffztybmyggpeTZ4rDxPqNVYI8j0&hl=en&ei=dld0TKnaG5K8sAP4rtm7CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&sqi=2&ved=0CCoQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=toma%20tasaki&f=false

    Harold Hirano 1907-1989, baby brother of Stationers Corp. genesis James Hirano 1896-1986, was a great vocalist, the male version of beautiful songbird Sister Luedeen Andrew born 1943. My baby brother Lloyd carries a tune well like Harold, but Lloyd only sings in church, as does gorgeous but grassroot Sister Luedeen Andrew.

    Lennon’s “Across the Universe” envelops me as I reminisce about Harold Hirano & images of life’s past events/experiences.

    Lyrics:
    Words are flowing out like
    endless rain into a paper cup
    They slither wildly while they pass
    They slip away across the universe

    JOHN 1980: “I was a bit more artsy-fartsy there. I was lying next to my first wife in bed, (song originally written in 1967) you know, and I was irritated. She must have been going on and on about something and she’d gone to sleep”“ and I kept hearing these words over and over, flowing like an endless stream. I went downstairs and it turned into a sort of cosmic song rather than an irritated song”“ rather than “ËœWhy are you always mouthing off at me?’ or whatever, right? “¦and I’ve sat down and looked at it and said, “ËœCan I write another one with this meter?’ It’s so interesting. “ËœWords are flowing out like endless rain into a paper cup/ They slither while the pass, they slip away across the universe.’ Such an extraordinary meter and I can never repeat it! It’s not a matter of craftsmanship”“ it wrote itself. It drove me out of bed. I didn’t want to write it”¦ and I couldn’t get to sleep until I put it on paper”¦ It’s like being possessed”“ like a psychic or a medium. The thing has to go down. It won’t let you sleep, so you have to get up, make it into something, and then you’re allowed to sleep. That’s always in the middle of the night when you’re half-awake or tired and your critical facilities are switched off.” http://www.lyricinterpretations.com/Beatles/Across-the-Universe

    Words are flowing out like endless rain into a paper cup,
    They slither while they pass, they slip away across the universe
    Pools of sorrow, waves of joy are drifting through my open mind,
    Possessing and caressing me.
    Jai guru deva om
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world.

    Images of broken light which dance before me like a million eyes,
    They call me on and on across the universe,
    Thoughts meander like a restless wind inside a letter box they
    Tumble blindly as they make their way
    Across the universe
    Jai guru deva om
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world.

    Sounds of laughter shades of light are ringing
    Through my open views inciting and inviting me
    Limitless undying love which shines around me like a
    Million suns, it calls me on and on
    Across the universe
    Jai guru deva om
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world,
    Nothing’s gonna change my world.

    Jai guru deva
    Jai guru deva
    Jai guru deva

    In his 1970 interview with Rolling Stone, Lennon referred to the song as perhaps the best, most poetic lyric he ever wrote.
    ” It’s one of the best lyrics I’ve written. In fact, it could be the best. It’s good poetry, or whatever you call it, without chewin’ it. See, the ones I like are the ones that stand as words, without melody. They don’t have to have any melody, like a poem, you can read them.”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Across_the_Universe

    Yes, Tommy Hirano 1928-2009 is Stationer Corp. founder James’ son & a good guy, uncle of former circuit judge Riki May Hirano Amano, Riki also a Honzaki girl [Wainaku roots].
    http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2003/Mar/25/ln/ln50aobituaries.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gielgud#John_Gielgud_in_popular_culture

    Laurence Olivier’s friendship with Gielgud was peppered with barely acknowledged competitive tension, for, while Olivier’s fame as a film actor eventually eclipsed Gielgud’s, Gielgud had been the great Shakespearean actor when Olivier was just coming up and that was hard for Olivier to forget. Gielgud maintained a very close relationship with Olivier’s second wife, Vivien Leigh, throughout their marriage, divorce, and her long struggle with manic depression. In Curtain (1991), Michael Korda’s novel based on the marriage of Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh, Gielgud becomes Philip Chagrin.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurence_Olivier

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pride_and_Prejudice#Major_themes

    A major theme in much of Austen’s work is the importance of environment and upbringing on the development of young people’s character and morality. Social standing and wealth are not necessarily advantages in her world, and a further theme common to Jane Austen’s work is ineffectual parents. In Pride and Prejudice, the failure of Mr and Mrs Bennet (particularly the latter) as parents is blamed for Lydia’s lack of moral judgment; Darcy, on the other hand, has been taught to be principled and scrupulously honourable, but is also proud and overbearing. Kitty, rescued from Lydia’s bad influence and spending more time with her older sisters after they marry, is said to improve greatly in their superior society.

    Style

    Pride and Prejudice, like most of Jane Austen’s works, employs the narrative technique of free indirect speech. This has been defined as “the free representation of a character’s speech, by which one means, not words actually spoken by a character, but the words that typify the character’s thoughts, or the way the character would think or speak, if she thought or spoke”. By using narrative which adopts the tone and vocabulary of a particular character (in this case, that of Elizabeth), Austen invites the reader to follow events from Elizabeth’s viewpoint, sharing her prejudices and misapprehensions. “The learning curve, while undergone by both protagonists, is disclosed to us solely through Elizabeth’s point of view and her free indirect speech is essential “¦ for it is through it that we remain caught, if not stuck, within Elizabeth’s misprisions.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Austen#Twentieth_century_and_beyond
    Austen’s works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the eighteenth century and are part of the transition to nineteenth-century realism. Austen’s plots, though fundamentally comic, highlight the dependence of women on marriage to secure social standing and economic security. Like those of Samuel Johnson, one of the strongest influences on her writing, her works are concerned with moral issues.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Johnson#Critical_theory
    When it came to biography, Johnson disagreed with Plutarch’s use of biography to praise and to teach morality. Instead, Johnson believed in portraying the biographical subjects accurately and including any negative aspects of their lives. Because his insistence on accuracy in biography was little short of revolutionary, Johnson had to struggle against a society that was unwilling to accept biographical details that could be viewed as tarnishing a reputation; this became the subject of Rambler 60. Furthermore, Johnson believed that biography should not be limited to the most famous and that the lives of lesser individuals, too, were significant; thus in his Lives of the Poets he chose both great and lesser poets. In all his biographies he insisted on including what others would have considered trivial details to fully describe the lives of his subjects. Johnson considered the genre of autobiography and diaries, including his own, as one having the most significance; in Idler 84 he explains how a writer of an autobiography would be the least likely to distort his own life.

    Johnson’s thoughts on biography and on poetry coalesced in his understanding of what would make a good critic. His works were dominated with his intent to use them for literary criticism. This was especially true of his Dictionary of which he wrote: “I lately published a Dictionary like those compiled by the academies of Italy and France, for the use of such as aspire to exactness of criticism, or elegance of style”. Although a smaller edition of his Dictionary became the standard household dictionary, Johnson’s original Dictionary was an academic tool that examined how words were used, especially in literary works. To achieve this purpose, Johnson included quotations from Bacon, Hooker, Milton, Shakespeare, Spenser, and many others from what he considered to be the most important literary fields: natural science, philosophy, poetry, and theology. These quotations and usages were all compared and carefully studied in the Dictionary so that a reader could understand what words in literary works meant in context.
    “”
    Plays of William Shakespeare (1773 expanded edition) title page

    Not being a theorist, Johnson did not attempt to create schools of theories to analyse the aesthetics of literature. Instead, he used his criticism for the practical purpose of helping others to better read and understand literature. When it came to Shakespeare’s plays, Johnson emphasised the role of the reader in understanding language: “If Shakespeare has difficulties above other writers, it is to be imputed to the nature of his work, which required the use of common colloquial language, and consequently admitted many phrases allusive, elliptical, and proverbial, such as we speak and hear every hour without observing them”.

    His works on Shakespeare were devoted not merely to Shakespeare, but to understanding literature as a whole; in his Preface to Shakespeare, Johnson rejects the previous dogma of the classical unities and argues that drama should be faithful to life. However, Johnson did not only defend Shakespeare; he discussed Shakespeare’s faults, including his lack of morality, his vulgarity, his carelessness in crafting plots, and his occasional inattentiveness when choosing words or word order. As well as direct literary criticism, Johnson emphasised the need to establish a text that accurately reflects what an author wrote. Shakespeare’s plays, in particular, had multiple editions, each of which contained errors caused by the printing process. This problem was compounded by careless editors who deemed difficult words incorrect, and changed them in later editions. Johnson believed that an editor should not alter the text in such a way.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antihero#Distinction_from_unlikely_heroes

    Distinction from unlikely heroes

    The traditional hero type is classically depicted to possess an image that is larger than life. They are generally expected to be more physically attractive, stronger, braver, more clever or charismatic than the average everyman. Unlikely heroes are simply characters who may not be conspicuously flawed, but simply ordinary people thrust into extraordinary circumstances.

    In popular culture

    Modern-day heroes have enjoyed an increased moral complexity. In 1930, originally introduced as a mysterious radio narrator by David Chrisman, William Sweets, and Harry Engman Charlot for Street and Smith Publications, The Shadow was fully developed and transformed into a pop culture antihero icon by pulp writer Walter B. Gibson. Mid-20th century playwrights such as Samuel Beckett and Tom Stoppard showcased anti-heroic protagonists recognizable by their lack of identity and determination. Pulp fiction and noir detective stories of the mid-20th century saw characters such as Sam Spade, who lacked the glorious appeal of previous heroic figures, become popular. Influenced by the pulps, early comic books featured anti-heroic characters such as Sub-Mariner (who would just as soon conquer humanity as try to save it). Marvel’s most prolific anti-hero is perhaps The Punisher, who is more than willing to kill those who he views as deserving of death. Sergio Leone’s “spaghetti westerns” showcased a wandering vigilante (the “Man with No Name” played by Clint Eastwood) whose gruff demeanor clashed with other heroic characteristics.

    Many modern antiheroes possess, or even encapsulate, the postmodern rejection of traditional values symptomatic of Modernist literature in general, as well as the disillusion felt after World War II and the Nuclear Age. The continuing popularity of the antihero in modern literature and popular culture may be based on the recognition that a person is fraught with human frailties, unlike the archetypes of the white-hatted cowboy and the noble warrior, and is therefore more accessible to readers and viewers. This popularity may also be symptomatic of the rejection by the avant-garde of traditional values after the counter-culture revolution of the 1960s.

    In the postmodern era, traditionally defined heroic qualities, akin to the classic “knight in shining armor” type, have given way to the “gritty truth” of life, and authority in general is being questioned. The brooding vigilante or “noble criminal” archetype, seen in characters like Batman or Dirty Harry, is slowly becoming part of the popular conception of heroic valor rather than being characteristics that are deemed un-heroic.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_C._Quantrill
    Reputation and legacy

    Quantrill’s actions remain controversial to this day. Some historians view him as an opportunistic, bloodthirsty outlaw; James M. McPherson, one of America’s most prominent experts on the Civil War today, calls him and Anderson “pathological killers” who “murdered and burned out Missouri Unionists.” Others, such as Missouri biographer Paul R. Petersen, continue to regard him as a daring horse soldier and a local folk hero. Some of Quantrill’s celebrity later rubbed off on other ex-Raiders ““ Jesse and Frank James, and Cole and Jim Younger ““ who went on after the war to apply Quantrill’s hit-and-run tactics to bank and train robbery. The William Clarke Quantrill Society continues to research and celebrate his life and deeds.

    According to Lost Treasure and similar related (and not very accurate) magazines, Quantrill allegedly cached treasure worth millions of U.S. dollars all over the area he operated in. He allegedly got this huge fortune by robbery and by plundering.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congregationalist

    The Pilgrims sought to establish at Plymouth Colony a Christian fellowship like that which gathered around Jesus himself.[citation needed] Congregationalists include the Pilgrims of Plymouth, and the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which were organized in union by the Cambridge Platform in 1648. These settlers had John Cotton as their most influential leader, beginning in 1633. Cotton’s writings persuaded the Calvinist theologian John Owen to separate from the Presbyterian church. He became very influential in the development of Congregationalist theology and ideas of church government. Jonathan Edwards, considered by some to be the most important theologian produced in the United States, was also a Congregationalist.

    The history of Congregational churches in the United States is closely intertwined with that of American Presbyterianism, especially in New England where Congregationalist influence spilled over into Presbyterian churches farther west. Some of the first colleges and universities in America, including Harvard, Yale, Dartmouth, Williams, Bowdoin, Middlebury, and Amherst, all were founded by the Congregationalists, as were later Carleton, Grinnell, Oberlin, and Pomona.

    Without higher courts to ensure doctrinal uniformity among the congregations, Congregationalists have been more diverse than other Reformed churches. Despite the efforts of Calvinists to maintain the dominance of their system, some Congregational churches, especially in the older settlements of New England, gradually developed leanings toward Arminianism, Unitarianism, Deism, and transcendentalism.

    By the 1750s, several Congregational preachers were teaching the possibility of universal salvation, an issue that caused considerable conflict among its adherents on the one side and hard-line Calvinists and sympathizers of the First Great Awakening on the other. In another strain of change, the first church in the United States with an openly Unitarian theology, the belief in the single personality of God, was established in Boston, Massachusetts in 1785 (in a former Anglican parish.) By 1800, all but one Congregational church in Boston had Unitarian preachers teaching the strict unity of God, the subordinate nature of Christ, and salvation by character.

    Harvard University, founded by Congregationalists, became a center of Unitarian training. Prompted by a controversy over an appointment in the theology school at Harvard, in 1825 the Unitarian churches separated from Congregationalism. Most of the Unitarian “descendants” hold membership in the Unitarian Universalist Association, founded in the 1960s by a merger with the theologically similar Universalists. This group had dissented from Calvinist orthodoxy on the basis of their belief that all persons could find salvation (as opposed to the Calvinist idea of double predestination, excluding some from salvation.)

    Congregational churches were at the same time the first example of the American theocratic ideal and also the seedbed from which American liberal religion and society arose. Many Congregationalists in the several successor denominations to the original tradition consider themselves to be Reformed first, whether of traditional or neo-orthodox persuasion.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unitarianism
    Christology (distinction from Arianism)

    Historically the Arianism and unitarianism of the 16th”“19th centuries could be divided based on whether Jesus was believed to have had a pre-human existence. Both forms maintain that God is one being and one “person””the one Jesus called “Father””and that Jesus is the (or a) Son of God, but generally not God himself.

    Arianism ““ Personal pre-human existence

    In one form, the Son of God is considered to have pre-existed as the Logos, a being created by God, who dwelt with God in heaven prior to his birth as the man, Jesus. This theology is commonly called Arianism; however, there are many varieties of this form of Unitarianism, ranging from the belief that the Son was a divine spirit of the same nature as God before coming to earth, to the belief that he was an angel or other lesser spirit creature of a wholly different nature from God. Arius’ views represent only one variation of this theology.

    In this belief system, Jesus is be

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  • Curtis Narimatsu

    Chorimbo typecast as Hiroshima aspersion for person of poverty/impoverishment. Hoito vs. Hiroshima symbol as greedy. Warui is Kyushu typecast rascal/naughty. Midori Kunimitsu lent Tsukasa Ishii her photo of Rev. Shiro Sokabe, but never got it back from blowhard/braggart/arrogant Tsukasa, only to find later that Tsukasa claimed it as Tsukasa’s personal collection/archives. Honomu’s Shoji Okido KIA on SS Royal Frank Jan. 28 1942, and has Honomu school park banyan tree planted in his memory, just as the other banyan tree honors our haole messiah Chuck Skeen KIA Pacific Theater WWII. Two great lasting heroes from Honomu. Groan Yugawa had daughters & planted daikon [male phallus symbol] to get sons but sprouted only ma-may [mameya] beans [female cl_t], as in Punahoa Lane’s Mameya Row/Lane where today’s Shinmachi Kamehameha Statue is [Punahoa Mameya Lane had brothels White Picket Fence--Doc Hill's venue--Green Roof/Mango Tree, & today's Nihon Restaurant site had Red Light brothel, w/Hisa Hisanaga godfather/vice admiral, whereas Butcher Lane off Kumu St. makai of Volcano Arena had the Cottage, Puerto Rican/Pinoy johns serviced by haole gals]. Tut sirk pundot Luso for no butt, as in girls who have flat ass_s, referring to skinny girls.

    Public high school diploma available only to post-1920 born local plantation kids, inasmuch pre-1920 born kids were discriminated against via unconscionable public school tuition fees after the 8th grade. Thence, Uncle Willy Thompson’s post-1920 born 442 brats hi maka maka pride vs. pre-1920 born 100th Batt. conscripts. Honomu’s Castle Kailimai proud like Uncle Willy, sh_t no stink, inasmuch Castle from high-rooted Honomu scion, but Castle’s mom Abbie the sweetest angel on earth, 95 yrs. young born 1915. Abbie’s hubby a Keamo [adopted by Abbie's uncle] who was proud like Uncle Willy. Abbie’s dad the sweetest shepard on earth.

    Prejudice/discrimination?? From 1920 to 1933, as Asian progeny/U.S. citizens grew greatly in numbers, public school tuition fees were increased to exclude plantation kids after the 6th grade, and after much revolt by plantation laborers, to exclude kids after the 8th grade, which is why only post-1920 born plantation kids had the blessing of public school DPI/DOE chief & grassroot messiah Oren Long 1934-1946, a Kansas granger, to advance forward after the 8th grade, ergo after 1933. My dad 1913-1998 is a product of the pre-Oren Long era, never graduating past the 8th grade.

    As the American-born children of Asian & European immigrants [ergo Luso/Latino] increased greatly in numbers, Thurstonite retrogrades [Lorrin A. Thurston, Lorrin P. Thurston, etc.] fretted that our public education system was not what it should be. Thurstonites slurred that the taxpayers should be relieved of the responsibility of a public school pupil after the child reaches the 6th grade, or at worst, the 8th grade, inasmuch the system of young people occupying a position, free of any thought of responsibility, up to the age when these young people should properly have some of their life’s problems settled is wrong. Of course, Thurstonites & Big 5 oligarchs have extreme tax breaks/write-offs to pewter/eliminate their taxes. Thurstonites exhort that a student who spends many years receiving a public school education is bound to get big-headed and hope to occupy positions reserved for others and would have to spend a long time unlearning what the student had learned in school, thus resulting in a disgruntled, dissatisfied, and disappointed class of people ready to follow any obsessed agitator. Instead, Thurstonite bigots promulgate it to be wiser and to the advantage of the taxpayer to put a boy or girl on such child’s own resources after the child has mastered sufficient learning for ordinary common lot living. Employment in the low rungs of the economy will give them actual experience in the world of hard knocks, which they are ideally suited for, having come from austere roots. Thurstonite bigots promoted the ideal of keeping non-Stateside immigrants’ kids on the same social standing/status as their immigrant parents. And, as in the case of Japanese American kids, who were shackled by Japan’s insane dual citizenship [to keep sojourner/settler monies flowing to the Imperial Palance of the Hito family, ergo Hirohito], Thurstonite bigots excluded kids of dual citizenship from attending public school advanced college track programs, effectively shutting out a buddahead with an ounce of brain who was born before 1920. The U.S. Attorney General declared in 1932 that enlightened public school educators, reared Stateside as acolytes of Horace Mann/John Dewey, grassroot avatars [Mann's Antioch College is my alma mater], expressed utter disbelief at Thurstonites that any number of educated immigrant kids should ever go back to the plantations so as not to upset the status quo, ergo, Thurston’s Honolulu Advertiser control over the common lot of color and class. Immigrant parents were incensed that retrogrades like Thurston would calculate via public schooling to keep immigrants’ kids enslaved to the feudal plantation system. The U.S. Attorney General concluded after extensive study of conditions in territorial era Hawai’i, that immigrant “parents were anxious to get away from the plantations, both for themselves and their children. Curiously enough, labor itself does not seem the real objection. The fact is that such labor is looked on as menial and degrading, and the parents want none of it for their offspring.” U.S. Senate testimony 1932.

    Yes, as greatest mentor/alter ego Malie intones, we all fall short somehow, our human condition “ and, as with missionary progeny, you have exceptionally angelic ones like Frank Atherton [Merchant St. godfather, scion of C & C] & his Castle consort Rev. Bill Westervelt, along w/UH founder Charles Hemenway, and then you have the scum of the earth like the Thurstons. Yet, even in his race/class megalomania, scum emeritus Lorrin A. Thurston was our greatest conservationist/ecologist, ergo HVNP preservationism “ thence elucidating the ambivalence/paradox of our human condition “ or, as Malie’s father of tremendous wisdom would say, no one is perfect. Horace Mann/John Dewey, the Great Equalizers Via Public School Education, come from the same common stock [Pilgrims & Puritans] as repulsive Thurston, thus illustrating the irony of our human state “ Mann’s/Dewey’s Stateside emigrate acolytes/devotees upended our race/class hegemony foisted by Mann’s/Dewey’s ancestral kin Thurston. In the end, one would hope that life balances out into moderation, somewhat equidistant between leftists like Jim Albertini, Italian conflagrationary, and right-wing despots/tyrants like Thurston, deranged ignoble infamous son of missionary stock.
    # Curtis Narimatsu Says:
    August 15th, 2010 at 1:25 pm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horace_Mann

    Horace Mann (May 4, 1796 ““ August 2, 1859) was an American education reformer, and a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1827 to 1833. He served in the Massachusetts Senate from 1834-1837. In 1848, after serving as Secretary of the Massachusetts State Board of Education since its creation, he was elected to the US House of Representatives. Mann was a brother-in-law to author Nathaniel Hawthorne.

    Horace Mann was born on May 4, 1796, in Franklin, Massachusetts. His father was a farmer in limited circumstances, and the son was forced to procure by his own exertions the means of obtaining an education. He earned his school books when a child by braiding straw, and his severe and frugal life taught him habits of self-reliance and independence. From ten years of age to twenty he had never more than six weeks’ schooling during any year. He made use of the town library, founded by Benjamin Franklin. At the age of 20 he enrolled at Brown University, and graduated after three years as valedictorian of his class in 1819. The theme of his oration was “The Progressive Character of the Human Race.” He then studied law for a short time at Wrentham, Massachusetts; was a tutor of Latin and Greek (1820″“1822) and a librarian (1821″“1823) at Brown University. He also studied during 1821″“1823 at Litchfield Law School (the law school conducted by Judge Tapping Reeve in Litchfield, Connecticut), and in 1823, was admitted to the bar in Norfolk, Massachusetts.

    n 1838, he founded and edited The Common School Journal. In this journal, Mann targeted the public school and its problems. His six main principles were: (1) the public should no longer remain ignorant; (2) that such education should be paid for, controlled, and sustained by an interested public; (3) that this education will be best provided in schools that embrace children from a variety of backgrounds; (4) that this education must be non-sectarian ; (5) that this education must be taught by the spirit, methods, and discipline of a free society; and (6) that education should be provided by well-trained, professional teachers. Mann worked for more and better equipped school houses, longer school years (until 16 years old), higher pay for teachers, and a wider curriculum.

    The practical result of Mann’s work was a revolution in the approach used in the common school system of Massachusetts, which in turn influenced the direction of other states. In carrying out his work, Mann met with bitter opposition by some Boston schoolmasters who strongly disapproved of his innovative pedagogical ideas, and by various religious sectarians, who contended against the exclusion of all sectarian instruction from the schools. He is often considered “the father of American public education”.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dewey

    John Dewey (October 20, 1859 ““ June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform. Dewey, along with Charles Sanders Peirce and William James, is recognized as one of the founders of the philosophy of pragmatism and of functional psychology. He was a major representative of the progressive and progressive populist philosophies of schooling during the first half of the 20th century in the USA.

    Although Dewey is known best for his publications concerning education, he also wrote about many other topics, including experience, nature, art, logic, inquiry, democracy, and ethics.

    In his advocacy of democracy, Dewey considered two fundamental elements”schools and civil society”as being major topics needing attention and reconstruction to encourage experimental intelligence and plurality. Dewey asserted that complete democracy was to be obtained not just by extending voting rights but also by ensuring that there exists a fully-formed public opinion, accomplished by effective communication among citizens, experts, and politicians, with the latter being accountable for the policies they adopt.

    Dewey was born in Burlington, Vermont of modest family origins. Like his older brother, Davis Rich Dewey, he attended the University of Vermont, from which he graduated (Phi Beta Kappa) in 1879. After three years as a high school teacher in Oil City, Pennsylvania, Dewey decided that he was unsuited for employment in primary or secondary education. After studying with George Sylvester Morris, Charles Sanders Peirce, Herbert Baxter Adams, and G. Stanley Hall, Dewey received his Ph.D. from the School of Arts & Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. In 1884, he accepted a faculty position at the University of Michigan (1884″“1888 and 1889″“1894) with the help of George Sylvester Morris. His unpublished and now lost dissertation was titled “The Psychology of Kant”.

    In 1894 Dewey joined the newly founded University of Chicago (1894″“1904) where he developed his belief in an empirically based theory of knowledge, becoming associated with the newly emerging Pragmatic philosophy. His time at the University of Chicago resulted in four essays collectively entitled Thought and its Subject-Matter which was published with collected works from his colleagues at Chicago under the collective title Studies in Logical Theory (1903). During this time Dewey also initiated the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools where he was able to actualize his pedagogical beliefs which provided material for his first major work on education, The School and Society (1899). Disagreements with the administration ultimately caused his resignation from the University, and soon thereafter he relocated near the East Coast. In 1899, John Dewey was elected president of the American Psychological Association. From 1904 until his death he was professor of philosophy at both Columbia University and Columbia University’s Teachers College. In 1905 he became president of the American Philosophical Association. He was a long-time member of the American Federation of Teachers.

    While one biographer, Steven C. Rockefeller, traced Dewey’s democratic convictions to his childhood attendance at the Congregational Church, with its strong proclamation of social ideals, another, Edward A. White, a Stanford University professor of history, suggested in Science and Religion in American Thought (1952) that Dewey’s work had led to the 20th century rift between religion and science. However, in reviewing the book in The Quarterly Review of Biology (1954), noted geneticist H. Bentley Glass openly wondered if the controversy between religion and science would have been much the same, even if there had not been a John Dewey.

    Ruddy Tongg is Hakka, as are the Zanes. From magnanimous Mert Lau: Ruddy Jr. was best man for my wedding but we never thought about that distinction or question, but funny that here comes along “one budda head” who knows more about these formerly controversial or delicate matters than many of the local born pakes know. Junior and I were more interested in current events than whether we were punti, hakka, hokkien, chiu chow, see yup, Shanghai, Mongolian or whatever else. I think KL Ching would like to say we were more “halm supp.” I do not know what Senior’s first or second wife were. One day if I bump into Tenney Zane Tongg, I could ask him. Best, ““Mert

    Japan’s best/brightest studied in Germany a century ago, which is why original Big 5 Hackfeld was beneficent to our Issei immigrants, especially Kona coffee farmers.

    Because of Germany’s prominence in medical science and Japan’s preference for the German medical system, Uchimura among many young Japanese medical scientists, travelled to the institutes of German-speaking Europe for training. http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a921279945

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1294688/pdf/jrsocmed00082-0031.pdf

    http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/kalas/It_takes_great_faith_to_be_angry_with_God.html

    it takes great faith to be angry with God. In the same way it takes great faith in your mate to be rightfully angry in your marriage. In the same way that Jesus quotes the Psalms from the cross: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

    Anger is a holy, if difficult intimacy. Your estrangement is now a part of your journey with God.

    Most people, by the time they die, have a personal list in their pocket, which, upon arriving in heaven, they will go directly to the Complaints Department and submit. What the hell was this about? What did this mean? Why was this necessary?

    Or, perhaps death itself is a healing and transformative process that renders these questions irrelevant.

    But in the meantime, if we’re honest and human, we have to ask.

    http://www.javadc.org/Press%20release%2007-07-07%20Different%20Perceptions%20of%20the%20Loyalty%20Oath.htm

    DIFFERENT PERCEPTIONS OF THE LOYALTY OATH, QUESTIONS 27 AND 28. HAWAII MILITARY GOVERNOR DISPLAYED UNCOMMON COURAGE

    Nisei in Hawaii and the Mainland had a different perception of the Loyalty Oath, questions 27 and 28, they were required to sign to volunteer for the 442nd Regimental Combat Team in WW II. This paper discusses the differences.

    Military documents recovered from the National Archives indicate that one of the basic conditions to the formation of the Japanese American Combat Team was that all volunteers would be required to sign a loyalty oath (DSS Form 304A). A confidential memorandum from General Hayes A. Kroner, Chief, Military Intelligence Service on the organization of the combat team provided in part: “Selective Service is directed to call 4,500 men with approximately 1,500 to come from Hawaii. All will be general service and speak English. Arrangements have been made with the Selective Service system to require the execution of a DSS Form 304A for each male of military age who desires to make application for voluntary induction.”

    DSS Form 304A was actually a questionnaire innocuously titled “Statement of United States Citizen of Japanese Ancestry” consisting of 28 questions related to genealogy, family relations and personal life, organizations, affiliations and activities, connections with Japan, and culminating with the key questions #27 and #28 which read:
    “27. Are you willing to serve in the armed forces of the United States on combat duty, wherever ordered?
    28. Will you swear unqualified allegiance to the United States of America and faithfully defend the United States from any or all attack by foreign or domestic forces, and forswear any form of allegiance or obedience to the Japanese emperor, or any other foreign government, power, or organization?”

    For all of us volunteers from Hawaii, the first 26 items were hastily filled out and then questions 27 and 28 were treated as “no brainers” and the “Yes” answers were checked off without hesitation. This was exactly what we volunteered for! We would have signed any paper they put in front of us, so eager were we to volunteer. Almost 10,000 volunteered in a few days swamping the Draft Boards. This was the chance we had been waiting for.

    But on the mainland, the so-called loyalty oath was met with an entirely different response. The mainland reaction was traumatic and chaotic because all detainees in the ten relocation camps over 17 years in age including Issei and women were required to “register” by signing the loyalty questionnaire. First of all, they must have carefully read questions 27 and 28 because they found meanings and implications which were totally overlooked by the Hawaii volunteers. They could only view the document, submitted to them by a government that had taken everything away and deprived them of their liberty, with suspicion, distrust, cynicism and bitterness.

    Issei and women who were ineligible for military service were required to answer question 27 regarding their willingness to go to combat with the U.S. armed forces. If the non-citizen Issei who was legally barred from U.S. citizenship answered question 28 affirmatively forswearing any allegiance to the Emperor, would they then be left stateless, without citizenship of either Japan or the United States? Families feared or would be threatened with separation or breakup if the Nisei responded affirmatively as against the negative response of their Issei parents, forcing many Nisei to unwillingly respond “no” ““ “no” to the questionnaire.

    Many Nisei suspiciously viewed question 27 as an involuntary draft into military service if they answered “yes” and with question 28 they hesitated to “forswear allegiance to the Japanese Emperor” to whom they never held any loyalty or allegiance to in the first place and thought this was a trap question. Conditional or qualified answers (“Yes” if you release my family from camp) were disregarded or treated as “No” responses. And finally, there were many basically loyal Nisei who answered “no” ““ “no” to both questions out of sheer anger, bitterness and protest against the deprivation and violation of their civil rights.

    That such starkly contrasting reactive responses could be triggered by the same loyalty oath in Hawaii and the mainland can only be explained by the simple fact that in the latter case the loyalty screening was involuntarily imposed behind barbed wire enclosures in a liberty-deprived environment whereas in Hawaii it was not. The origins can be traced to the contrasting “tale of two generals” where General Delos C. Emmons of the Pacific Command and General John L. DeWitt of the Western Defense Command were both vested with the same authority to use Executive Order 9066 to address the “Japanese problem” but General DeWitt invoked that authority to forcefully evacuate 110,000 Japanese from the three Western states and incarcerate them in ten concentration camps in America’s wastelands, while on the other hand, General Emmons repeatedly deflected or ignored President Roosevelt’s orders to incarcerate them.

    General Emmons’ actions and policies were guided and advised by local leaders like FBI Hawaii Chief Robert Shivers, G-2 COL Kendall Fielder, Honolulu Police Captain John Burns, Charles Hemenway, Leslie Hicks and Hung Wai Ching vouching for the loyalty of Hawaii’s Japanese and averting any plan of their incaceration. The Japanese on the West Coast unfortunately had no such community leaders to support them. So looking back at this strange twist of fate, all of Hawaii’s Japanese can thankfully say: “Lucky we live in Hawaii!”

    http://uhalumni.org/s/1220/index.aspx?sid=1220&gid=1&pgid=439

    Distinguished Alumni by Graduation Year

    Key
    FA UH Founders Alumni Association Award
    DAA UHAA Distinguished Alumni Award
    LA UH Founders Alumni Association Lifetime Achievement Award
    * Deceased

    Degrees are from UH Mānoa unless otherwise listed.

    1910s

    Leslie A. Hicks (BS ’17)* President, Hawaiian Electric Co., former UH regent. FA ’52.

    William H. Meinecke (BS ’13)* UH registrar. FA ’51

    1920s

    Daniel K. “ËœAinoa (BS ’27)* Co-founder of Hawai”Ëœi Government Employees Association. FA ’52

    Gwenfread E. Allen (BA ’24)* Historian and author. FA ’67

    Neal S. Blaisdell (Attended ’21-’23, ’27-’28)* Honolulu mayor. FA ’63

    Laura P. Bowers (BA ’25)* Punahou School administrator. FA ’53

    Hung Wai Ching (BS ’28)* Real estate developer, co-founder of Aloha Airlines, UH regent. FA ’54, LA ’89

    Quan Lun Ching (BA ’28)* Insurance executive and schoolteacher. FA ’78

    Ezra J. Crane (attended ’19-’21)* Editor, Maui News. Headed military intelligence on Maui during World War II. FA ’61

    Carl Farden Sr. (BS ’25)* Hawai”Ëœi Sugar Planters Association chemist, UH regent. FA ’72

    May K. Gay (BA ’23)* UH associate professor of health and physical education. Composed the UH alma mater. FA ’52

    Baron Goto (BS ’24)* Agriculturist, UH professor and emeritus vice chancellor of East-West Center. FA ’53

    Bernhard L. Hormann (BA ’27, MA ’31)* UH emeritus professor of sociology. FA ’58.

    Doris K. M. Keppeler (BA ’24)* Pioneer instructor of Hawaiian culture, McKinley High School educator. FA ’54

    Herbert A. Keppeler (BS ’24)* Civil engineer, Kamehameha Schools trustee, UH regent. FA ’69

    Beatrice Krauss (BS ’26, MS ’30)* Ethnobotanist, educator author. FA ’56, DAA ’98

    Richard K. C. Lee (attended ’27-’29)* UH dean and professor of public health. FA ’68

    Richard Lyman Jr. (BS ’25)* Territorial and state senator, Kamehameha Schools trustee. FA ’75

    Iwao Miyake (BS ’26, MS ’29)* UH emeritus professor of physics, acoustics authority. FA ’53

    Jen Fui Moo (BA ’22)* Senior vice president/director of American Security Bank. FA ’57

    Richard Penhallow (BS ’26)* Parker Ranch manager, UH regent. Helped establish Hawai”Ëœi Preparatory Academy and Parker School. FA ’59, DAA ’89

    Richard H. Rice (BS ’28)* Vice president, Cooke Trust Co. FA ’64

    Shunzo Sakamaki (BA ’27, MA ’28)* UH chair/professor of history. FA ’55

    Theodore “Pump” Searle (BS ’26)* UH athletics director, Honolulu Stadium promotion manager. FA ’55

    Toma Tasaki (BS ’29) Public school administrator. FA ’70, FA ’83

    Fortunato Teho (BS ’27)* UH emeritus specialist in agricultural publications and information. FA ’77

    Masayuki Tokioka (BA ’25)* Businessman and philanthropist. Founded Island Insurance Companies. FA ’81, FA ’86

    Masao Yamada (BA ’29)* Minister. Worked with community leaders to establish UH Hilo. FA ’80

    Ah Hee Young (BA ’25)* Actress. Appeared in Hollywood productions as Soo Yong. FA ’62

    Yes, Hawaii Herald [Japanese American] buddahead writers have airs about themselves, and such are the effects of celebrity status, so to speak, in the buddahead ranks. On the other hand, Franklin Odo born 1939, our most esteemed buddahead chronicler, is earthy/accessible, though Odo is a single tasker guy, w/his mind on immigrant field songs and nothing else for now. Yes, Odo does not multi-task, to the chagrin of diverse thinkers like internationalist peer KingLit Ching born 1936, son of our greatest historymaker Rev. Hung Wai Ching 1905-2002. Odo’s mention of John Young/Pastor Stephen Mark seminal to the coalescence of the VVV [progenitors of 442nd RCT WWII] is not correct, in that Young had nothing to do w/VVV, & Mark’s contact was minimal w/VVV. Both Young/Mark were pillars of the newly formed breakaway [from conservative First/2nd Chinese Church of Honolulu] Community Church [Chinese enabled by Leigh Hooley/Chinese pastor Stephen Mark], but were not linked w/Rev. Hung Wai Ching, godfather/genesis of the VVV, Hung Wai a fellow pillar of the Community Church. Odo’s lumping together of Community Church Social Gospel catalysts for purposes of the formation of the VVV is incorrect.

    Wilfred Oka 1912-2009 was a candid leftv winger.
    Ichiro Izuka 1911-2002, brainwashed by Ed Berman, was sour grapes vs. Jack Hall 1915-1971, whom Berman lost to in a leadership/power struggle. So Izuka disclosed communist party members in 1947, because Hall supported GOP Joe Farrington, Izuka falsely saying that Hall/ILWU were Soviet agents who sought to overthrow democratic entities here. Izuka’s disclosure via Izuka’s pamphlet resulted in DOE dismissal of John/Aiko Tokimasa Reinecke/Reluctant 39 vs. HUAC/Hawai’i 7, later overturned on appeal. Oka was a dedicated labor leader, former YMCA instructor/swim coach, & later hired by Fasi born 1920 to P&R. Oka & Jack Kawano 1911-1984 organized laborers/longshoremen for ILWU long before Jack Hall came here. “ËœOpihikao Kawano is the pivotal labor organizer. Like Izuka, Kawano retaliated vs. Hall for Frisco’s pick of Hall over Kawano to head ILWU, via anti-Jap hysteria. Kawano/Izuka were pariahs/outcasts because they retaliated vs. Hall by snitching to red baiters. Ichiro Izuka 1911-2002, Kaua’i ILWU/CIO mainstay, got mad at Jack Hall because johnny come lately Hall 1915-1970 stole the thunder away from Izuka & Izuka’s senpai/mentor Ed Berman, labor lawyer, who was defeated by Hall for leadership of the ILWU. Izuka’s mistake is that Izuka named Communist Party members in Izuka’s pamphlet 1937, just blowback vs. Hall. Jack Kawano 1912-1984 made the same mistake to blowback vs. Hall for taking the top post away from Kawano.

    Here is Oka from 16 yrs. ago:

    WILFRED OKA

    Democratic Party Pioneer Puts His Unique Spin on the ’54 “ËœRevolution’

    In late 1993 82-year-old Wilfred Oka fell ill for the first time in his life. After returning home from an operation, Oka passed out and had to be rushed back to the hospital. He remained unconscious for three days. When he awoke, he looked around and joked. “Hey, where the hell am I anyway? And who are you?” he mugged, making the attending nurse laugh. “At least I still had my sense of humor,” Oka recalls with a kolohe grin. “Me, I gotta’ laugh-at myself, at others. That’s the only way I can live. Besides, I can get away with murder by doing this.”

    For practically all his life, Oka has gotten away with murder with murder, using his quick wit and sharp tongue to poke at and to prod the assumptions of the pompous and narrow-minded. While still in the hospital, he gave a young doctor a quick attitude adjustment. “Eh Doc,” Oka called in his best pidgin English,” I can ask you something? You local boy”¦ you Japanese”¦ you third generation”¦ you went to Burns School (of Medicine), yeah? Come, I tell you something. Take a good look at me. My name is Oka,” he began, drawing the doctor’s close attention. “If wasn’t for guys like us, no more this kind Burns school, you know? You guys would be hoe hana, digging ditches on the plantation. But I gonna’ tell you something else, too. As a doctor, you not there. There’s plenty old guys like us, we over the hill. Why don’t you give each one of us at least five minutes of your time. Give us counseling and guidance.

    You treating me just like I’m one old fut. Yeah, I am an old fut. But, c’mon, give us a little more credit. We lived through all of this, you know. Guys our generation, we made the University of Hawai`i, we made the Richardson School (of law) and the Burns School.

    You lucky you can go over there. So I’m gonna’ tell you something,” he concluded, leaning forward for emphasis. “I think I’m in good shape. I can turn around and I can kick your ass”¦”

    The nurses who were within earshot of the exchange burst out in cheers.

    Oka describes himself as an educator and self-styled satirist. His life has been dedicated to fighting a litany of liberal causes, and includes a longtime commitment to the Democratic Party. Oka’s life story, like his mercurial personality, would be impossible to capture, but a few vignettes may help to provide a glimpse into this feisty, yet engagingly whimsical, party pioneer.

    As the head swim coach at the Nuuanu YMCA in 1939, Oka took his talent-laden team to the national championships on the Mainland. When his team and other teams comprised largely of ethnic minorities were only granted night access to the pool to train, Oka hit the roof.

    He threatened to call a press conference and lead a boycott of the competition on the basis of discrimination. The organizers quickly caved in, afraid of the negative backlash. “Even more than winning the national championship, I viewed that as the major victory for us,” he reflects. “It opened the doors not only for Japanese Americans, but to Blacks and Mexican Americans as well.

    The following year, Oka was chosen to represent the YMCA staff before the national board to argue for equal rights. He implored the YMCA to adopt the same standards as the YWCA, which he said had earlier instituted equal opportunity and equal pay for equal work politics.

    Oka admits that his outspoken nature has not always served his own best interest.

    While attending classes at Columbia University in 1940, for example, Oka believes the speeches he delivered denouncing the Japanese military probably cost him a fellowship to study at Doshisha University in Kyoto.

    Later, during the war, Oka worked for the federal government to enforce the Davis-Bacon Act. At the construction site of a bridge near Honolulu Airport, he discovered that Japanese workers were being paid only half as much as Caucasian workers. To dramatically make his point, Oka told one of the senior workers to gather 20 other AJAs on the crew together. He then confronted the contractor. “I told him to get 20 haole guys, and we’d challenge them to build this bridge.

    We would have won hands down,” he scoffs. The case ultimately was decided through a hearing. The firm was cited and the laborers won their case.

    Oka is best remembered for his role as the director of adult education for Nuuanu YMCA.

    He worked out of an office located near the corner of Nuuanu Avenue and Vineyard Boulevard. The building was owned by Takaichi Miyamoto. Next door, John A. Burns and Mitsuyuki Kido organized the work of the Emergency Service Committee during the war. That same office would later serve as Burns’ campaign headquarters.

    “Takaichi Miyamoto 1897-1981 was a true Democrat,” Oka states. Miyamoto was an early Japanese entrepreneur who managed to amass a respectable fortune through such enterprises as Pacific Liquors and by trading in Japanese goods. Oka would later run Miyamoto’s Bethel Street liquor store for him, and eventually bought the operation from him. “He was a brilliant guy.”

    Miyamoto was closely involved with the Democratic Party at a very early stage, and enjoyed an especially close relationship with Honolulu Mayor John H. Wilson. One day Miyamoto called Oka over to his office and asked him to “go help Johnny Wilson.” It was Oka’s first major political project. His first objective was to open up the Honolulu Fire Department to men of Japanese ancestry, so they cut a deal. If Wilson got elected, he would hire seven AJA firefighters. “You’ve got to understand, back then we had to fight for things that are taken for granted these days.”

    Oka’s involvement in the labor movement and Mayor Wilson’s campaign preceded the rise of the so-called “Burns Machine” in the Democratic Party politics. “In my view, the guys who were the original organizers of the Democratic Party were people like (former Supreme Court Chief Justice ) Bill Richardson’s father, Chuck Mau, Mits Kido, Takaichi Miyamoto, Charlie Kauhane, Noble Kauhane,” he says. “They were before the Burns guys.” Oka also points out that the significance of the Hawaiian Homerule Party, which essentially merged with the Democratic Party, is too often overlooked. The other key element, Oka adds, is, “The real old-timers of the Democratic Party were motivated by the labor movement.” Although he was never employed by the union, Oka always maintained a close relationship with labor activists of his day. He worked to sign up Democrats from within the ranks of the ILWU, and helped to “ghost write” speeches and other materials for the union’s cause.

    As a writer, Oka also penned a regular column for Koji Ariyoshi’s pro-labor weekly, The Honolulu Record, from its inception to its closure. Even in the genre of its writing a sports column, Oka says he sought out subjects affecting discrimination and economic hardships.

    For example, he wrote about boxers getting killed and maimed in the ring, but who had no insurance. He interviewed Black pitcher Satchel Paige when he was in Hawai`i, when the general public did not even know who Satchel Paige was.

    Oka believes he naturally developed his strong affinity for labor issues while he was growing up, simply by seeing the way Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Chinese and Hawaiian workers were mistreated. As a youngster, he remembers taking food to strikers camped in tents at Aala Park. ” My father had an aku boat. My mother made musubi. Father made aku, and they used me to help deliver the food. That was my first impression”“ circumstances created me,” he reflects.

    Later, Oka remembers going to Aala Park to listen to charismatic Filipino labor leader Pablo Manlapit speak. “I was a great follower of Pablo Manlapit,” he adds. But the main lesson to be learned through the early Filipino and Japanese strikes was that individual ethnic groups could not successfully organize separately. “The ILWU created the greatest amalgamation, intercourse between ethnic groups,” Oka insists.

    In time, however, it seemed Oka’s fortunes moved in reverse order with the rise of the Burns group in the early “Ëœ50s. “the members of that so-called veterans group were like super patriots in those days; and they really let us have it. Anybody with labor connections was classified as a radical and a left-winger.” Although he long maintained precinct and district leadership roles within the party; Oka became a victim in the party’s move to rid its self of any labor affiliations. I got dumped by Dan Inouye as secretary for the Democratic Party by two votes. “I’ll never forget that. They went up and waved an American flag at the Democratic County Convention on Oahu. That was a key election, because Democratic Committee was controlled by Honolulu.”

    Still, Oka smiles and say, “They (the Burns group, aided in large part by nisei veterans) did a good job. We (organized labor) still continued to help. I wouldn’t rally call it a rift,” he says.

    During the Statehood hearings, however, it seems as though the Democratic Party wished it had a broad, gaping rift between itself and labor. Oka remembers being put on the stand and asked “over 100 questions,” each attempting, somehow, to link the Democratic Party with labor activists. Oka refused to succumb to the “Red-baiting” tactics employed during the hearings by refusing to answer.

    Most of Oka’s political life has been spent as an insider’s-outsider. In the landmark primary battle between Tom Gill and Kenny Brown for lieutenant governor, Oka again found himself squarely in the ranks of the “dissident group.” “I could understand what Burns wanted,” he reflects. He wanted to get the support of the so-called moderates, the bankers and the Big Five.

    I saw Brown as a Republican, and I said so. I was right on the s-it list.”

    Oka recently stepped back into active Democratic Party politics. “I went to meeting recently”¦ was too intellectual for me,” said the learned gentlemen. “I couldn’t follow them.” As usual, a measure of sarcasm may have lurked below the surface of his demeanor. “Hey, I’m a pragmatist. You know what I believe? I believe we gotta’ go after the 18- to 35-year-old group, that’s what we really need to do. Not only Japanese, but the newer immigrant group like the Vietnamese, Laotians, the Thai, the Hmong “ we gotta’ get those guys into the Democratic Party. The intellectual approach won’t work. “We gotta’ do all over again what we used to do. Start with a small group, assign one guy to get five to 10 guys. Utilize the principle of concentric circles. One starts and then it ripples out. That’s what I’m after.

    http://www.scottfoster.org/40_Years_After.htm

    Inimitable upender of status quo nearly a century ago ““Billy Bassett, Kanaka Johnny Wilson’s great speechwriter/aide de camp “ Kanaka Johnny 1871-1956 is the first Hawaiian Democrat, per Bob Krauss 1924-2006

    William K. Bassett, administrative assistant to the mayor of Hono-
    lulu, falls into the category of those liberals who have aided and
    abetted the Communists’ front publication, the Honolulu Record.
    By serving as a columnist for the Record, he has imparted an aura
    of respectability which the subversive publication does not deserve.
    This definitely was not in the best interests of the people of Hawaii
    or the Government of which he is an official. http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/united-states-congress-house-committee-on-un-am/report-on-the-honolulu-record-tin/page-2-report-on-the-honolulu-record-tin.shtml

    Koji Ariyoshi 1914-1976, editor of common laborer’s Honolulu Record, and Wilfred Oka were great admirers of firebrand William K. Bassett, their progenitor from a generation before.

    No, auspicious Rev. John Young 1902-1990 is Scot, not Chinese. Young was disinherited from wealth by his NYC Scot father because Young served the unwashed/unclean Chinese of society, per Social Gospel. It is no secret that Young’s effeminate manners/ways turned off his nail-tough papa. Post-1920 born plantation kids had the blessing of a high school diploma, unlike pre-1920 born kids who were shackled by Big 5 exclusion from further public schooling after the 6th grade [for kids born pre-1912] & after the 8th grade [for kids born between 1912-1919], of yogore/dirty-feet kids. Which is why our 442 boys, 9 out of 10 of our 442 enlistees born 1920 & after [such as Ted Tsukiyama born 1920, & Isamu Kanekuni born 1921, both still razor sharp], armed with the all-powerful/ultra-potent high school diploma [comparable to college degree 70 yrs. ago], are full-on snotballs/snobs, unlike their spiritually resurgent antecedents, namely our 100th Batt. conscripts, ergo buddaheads born 1918 & before [conscripts had to be at least 23 yrs. old in the draft 1940-1941], blue collar boys who were deprived of a high school diploma. Of course, the 100th Batt., attached as the 1st Batt. of the later 442 RCT [enlistees made up 2nd/3rd Batt. of 3 batt. 442 RCT], was the greatest fighting unit in the 442, & the 100th was the backup in the rescue of the Alamo Lost Battalion. Look at our 442 boys, especially our rubber necker current leaders/exemplars like Tsukiyama/Kanekuni above, and like longtime State Prexy & Waiakea Houselot native Uncle Willy Okino Thompson born 1924, & Uncle Willy’s boys in the “Ëœhood like Ed Ichiyama/Tsukasa Ishii/Moriso Teraoka “ all punks/snotts “ it’s amazing how a high school diploma generates self-congratulatory behavior/egomania. Contrast such self-indulgent ego-stroking mania among our post-1920 born snobs with our pre-1920 born humble pies, incredibly magnanimous chaps like LA’s Jack Wakamatsu 1918-2002 & braggart John Ushijima’s [John 1924-2006] older brah/100th veteran Shigeru Ushijima 1918-2009. Night/day, brah’. Our social climber/status tripper Hawaii Herald buddahead publication sadly fast patterns itself after our Tsukiyamas/Ichiyamas of the post-1920 born brats/snobs. Look at great haoles like Heco’s Leslie Hicks/UH founder Charles Hemenway “ Hicks grew up here among the unwashed/unclean of society & went to all-local McKinley High, among the tiniest few haoles at an all-local school, & Hicks went to Hemenway’s UH, Hicks 20 yrs. younger than Hemenway [Charles 1875-1947 is guru of Rev. Hung Wai Ching 1905-2002]. Hemenway’s only child Charley died tragically in 1922, and Hemenway [born of the same Pilgrim roots like our missionaries, & like Star Bulletin's Walter Farrington/C&C-Merchant St. godfather Frank Atherton/Naval bastion Walt Dillingham] hanai’d [spiritually took in] Hung Wai Ching as his own prodigal son. All of which explain why Hicks/Hemenway [our dynamic He-Men] were willing to die for the unwashed/unclean of society, the typecast scoundrels of the poor/tenements such as our Asian immigrant progeny so villified by the Mr. Hydes of the rich/powerful [like Lorrin A. & Lorrin P. Thurston].

    William R. Castle 1878-1963 of our Castle & Cooke genesis was the antecedent to Shokan “Jesse” Shima[bukuro] 1900-2001 in U.S.-Japan relations. Castle was deemed obsolete by FDR’s gang after Japan’s military takeover of affairs during FDR’s era. Hilo’s Jesse Shima became Japan’s unofficial liaison w/Presidents Truman & Ike after Japan’s surrender WWII. Shima was dearest buddy of FDR’s top aide Harry Hopkins [who would've advised President Truman if Hopkins had lived thru Truman's administration] & Ike’s top aide Jim Hagerty. Shima had his nephew, Pi’ihonua icon Henry Shimabukuro born 1931, present Ike/Hagerty w/gift from Hirohito. Henry is the earliest Okinawan ethnic to ascend up the U.S. Air Force ladder. Henry lives out a tranquil retirement in Henry’s okasan/mother Matsu’s old plantation whitewash/crackerbox home in Pi’ihonua Camp 4. No one outside of Pi’ihonua knows Henry, and no one outside of Pi’ihonua Camp 4 knows that Uncle Jesse is the greatest Nikkei [Japan immigrant to the U.S., Jesse/Issei immigrants prevented from getting U.S. citizenship until after 1952] in America. Amazing hidden history!! Harry Hopkins was a social worker, and President Truman and Jim Hagerty were high school graduates, just as Jesse never went beyond high school, though Jesse studied under Levi Lyman at Hilo Boarding School [Dan Inouye's dad also Lyman alumnus, as were KTA's Koichi Taniguchi/statesman Joseph Nawahi]. Jesse accomplished far more than Bill Castle because Bill was excluded by Japan’s militarists.

    http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~hou01504

    William Richards Castle (1878-1963) was an American diplomat. He served in the Department of State as chief of the Division of Western European Affairs (1921-1927), assistant secretary of state, and undersecretary of state. He was ambassador to Japan during the Naval Arms Conference, 1930. He later served as president of Garfield Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C. (1945-1952).
    # Curtis Narimatsu Says:
    August 19th, 2010 at 4:40 pm

    From magnanimous Mert Lau:

    Holy moley ““ I don’t know of any pake of our generation who knows more about sociological history of Chinese ““ Hawaiian ““ Japanese evolution on the local scene. Are you sure Curt from Hilo doesn’t have pake blood lines or, a pake wife or Hakka girlfriend? Would like to meet him if and when he comes to Honolulu. I’m sure we’d have a lot to talk about. Another hakka tidbit for Curtis ““ one of the greatest statesmen in Asia ““Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore is also hakka. We know his brother/Freddy Lee quite well and he told me that in that area of Asia, they refer to hakka as KEK.

    And the following tidbit of info about Ruddy Tongg will be of interest to Curtis.

    We took Jr. Tongg’s first wife/Linda to dinner last night (on 8/18) and I asked her if Jr’s mom (nee Eleanor Young) was also of hakka origin, which was confirmed by Linda. But Curtis would find interesting that Eleanor had a younger brother named David Kui Kong Young (doesn’t that ring a bell?), who at one time, was hired by Ruddy Sr. to be a bouncer at Sr.’s Waikiki Tavern on Kuhio beach. So Curtis can add to his boxing file that David was also Hakka.

    Best,

    Mert

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